Endoscopic therapy with 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate for the treatment of gastric varices

Arslan Kahloon, Naga Chalasani, John DeWitt, Suthat Liangpunsakul, Rakesh Vinayek, Raj Vuppalanchi, Marwan Ghabril, Michael Chiorean

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Gastric variceal bleeding is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and limited endoscopic therapeutic options. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the short- and long-term efficacy and safety of endoscopic therapy with 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate in patients with gastric variceal bleeding. Methods: A single-center retrospective review of patients receiving endoscopic therapy for gastric variceal hemorrhage. Patient demographics, laboratory, and procedural data were collected. Patients were followed to death, liver transplantation, or last follow-up. Success rates were defined as immediate control of bleeding; early re-bleeding (1-7 days), short-term re-bleeding (1-12 weeks), overall survival, and serious procedure complications. Results: A total of 41 patients (39 with cirrhosis) underwent 54 cyanoacrylate injections during study period. Mean age was 57 and 73 % were males. Twenty-four (58.5 %) patients had failed or were deemed ineligible for transjugular intra-hepatic portosystemic shunt, and 5 % were done for primary prophylaxis. Immediate hemostasis was achieved in five active bleeders. During a median survival time of 117 days, early re-bleeding was seen in 1 (2.4 %), short-term re-bleeding in five patients (12 %), and varices were eradicated in 15 (46.8 %) patients on follow-up. Mean MELD score at the time of the first injection was 17.1 ± 7.8. Mean volume injected was 3.4 cc and median number of varices injected per session was one. Eight patients died during the long-term follow-up: metastatic cancer (2), infections (3), liver failure (1), and re-bleeding (2). There were no serious procedure-related complications. Conclusions: Endoscopic cyanoacrylate therapy appears effective and safe for treatment of patients with bleeding from gastric varices or high-risk stigmata.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2178-2183
Number of pages6
JournalDigestive Diseases and Sciences
Volume59
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Esophageal and Gastric Varices
Hemorrhage
Cyanoacrylates
Therapeutics
Stomach
Varicose Veins
octyl 2-cyanoacrylate
Surgical Portasystemic Shunt
Christianity
Injections
Survival
Liver Failure
Hemostasis
Liver Transplantation
Fibrosis
Demography
Morbidity
Safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Physiology

Cite this

Endoscopic therapy with 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate for the treatment of gastric varices. / Kahloon, Arslan; Chalasani, Naga; DeWitt, John; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Vinayek, Rakesh; Vuppalanchi, Raj; Ghabril, Marwan; Chiorean, Michael.

In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, Vol. 59, No. 9, 2014, p. 2178-2183.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Gastric variceal bleeding is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and limited endoscopic therapeutic options. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the short- and long-term efficacy and safety of endoscopic therapy with 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate in patients with gastric variceal bleeding. Methods: A single-center retrospective review of patients receiving endoscopic therapy for gastric variceal hemorrhage. Patient demographics, laboratory, and procedural data were collected. Patients were followed to death, liver transplantation, or last follow-up. Success rates were defined as immediate control of bleeding; early re-bleeding (1-7 days), short-term re-bleeding (1-12 weeks), overall survival, and serious procedure complications. Results: A total of 41 patients (39 with cirrhosis) underwent 54 cyanoacrylate injections during study period. Mean age was 57 and 73 {\%} were males. Twenty-four (58.5 {\%}) patients had failed or were deemed ineligible for transjugular intra-hepatic portosystemic shunt, and 5 {\%} were done for primary prophylaxis. Immediate hemostasis was achieved in five active bleeders. During a median survival time of 117 days, early re-bleeding was seen in 1 (2.4 {\%}), short-term re-bleeding in five patients (12 {\%}), and varices were eradicated in 15 (46.8 {\%}) patients on follow-up. Mean MELD score at the time of the first injection was 17.1 ± 7.8. Mean volume injected was 3.4 cc and median number of varices injected per session was one. Eight patients died during the long-term follow-up: metastatic cancer (2), infections (3), liver failure (1), and re-bleeding (2). There were no serious procedure-related complications. Conclusions: Endoscopic cyanoacrylate therapy appears effective and safe for treatment of patients with bleeding from gastric varices or high-risk stigmata.",
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AU - Kahloon, Arslan

AU - Chalasani, Naga

AU - DeWitt, John

AU - Liangpunsakul, Suthat

AU - Vinayek, Rakesh

AU - Vuppalanchi, Raj

AU - Ghabril, Marwan

AU - Chiorean, Michael

PY - 2014

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N2 - Background: Gastric variceal bleeding is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and limited endoscopic therapeutic options. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the short- and long-term efficacy and safety of endoscopic therapy with 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate in patients with gastric variceal bleeding. Methods: A single-center retrospective review of patients receiving endoscopic therapy for gastric variceal hemorrhage. Patient demographics, laboratory, and procedural data were collected. Patients were followed to death, liver transplantation, or last follow-up. Success rates were defined as immediate control of bleeding; early re-bleeding (1-7 days), short-term re-bleeding (1-12 weeks), overall survival, and serious procedure complications. Results: A total of 41 patients (39 with cirrhosis) underwent 54 cyanoacrylate injections during study period. Mean age was 57 and 73 % were males. Twenty-four (58.5 %) patients had failed or were deemed ineligible for transjugular intra-hepatic portosystemic shunt, and 5 % were done for primary prophylaxis. Immediate hemostasis was achieved in five active bleeders. During a median survival time of 117 days, early re-bleeding was seen in 1 (2.4 %), short-term re-bleeding in five patients (12 %), and varices were eradicated in 15 (46.8 %) patients on follow-up. Mean MELD score at the time of the first injection was 17.1 ± 7.8. Mean volume injected was 3.4 cc and median number of varices injected per session was one. Eight patients died during the long-term follow-up: metastatic cancer (2), infections (3), liver failure (1), and re-bleeding (2). There were no serious procedure-related complications. Conclusions: Endoscopic cyanoacrylate therapy appears effective and safe for treatment of patients with bleeding from gastric varices or high-risk stigmata.

AB - Background: Gastric variceal bleeding is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and limited endoscopic therapeutic options. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the short- and long-term efficacy and safety of endoscopic therapy with 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate in patients with gastric variceal bleeding. Methods: A single-center retrospective review of patients receiving endoscopic therapy for gastric variceal hemorrhage. Patient demographics, laboratory, and procedural data were collected. Patients were followed to death, liver transplantation, or last follow-up. Success rates were defined as immediate control of bleeding; early re-bleeding (1-7 days), short-term re-bleeding (1-12 weeks), overall survival, and serious procedure complications. Results: A total of 41 patients (39 with cirrhosis) underwent 54 cyanoacrylate injections during study period. Mean age was 57 and 73 % were males. Twenty-four (58.5 %) patients had failed or were deemed ineligible for transjugular intra-hepatic portosystemic shunt, and 5 % were done for primary prophylaxis. Immediate hemostasis was achieved in five active bleeders. During a median survival time of 117 days, early re-bleeding was seen in 1 (2.4 %), short-term re-bleeding in five patients (12 %), and varices were eradicated in 15 (46.8 %) patients on follow-up. Mean MELD score at the time of the first injection was 17.1 ± 7.8. Mean volume injected was 3.4 cc and median number of varices injected per session was one. Eight patients died during the long-term follow-up: metastatic cancer (2), infections (3), liver failure (1), and re-bleeding (2). There were no serious procedure-related complications. Conclusions: Endoscopic cyanoacrylate therapy appears effective and safe for treatment of patients with bleeding from gastric varices or high-risk stigmata.

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