Endothelial exocytosis of angiopoietin-2 resulting from CCM3 deficiency contributes to cerebral cavernous malformation

Huanjiao Jenny Zhou, Lingfeng Qin, Haifeng Zhang, Wenwen Tang, Weidong Ji, Yun He, Xiaoling Liang, Zongren Wang, Qianying Yuan, Alexander Vortmeyer, Derek Toomre, Germaine Fuh, Minghong Yan, Martin S. Kluger, Dianqing Wu, Wang Min

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular malformations that affect the central nervous system and result in cerebral hemorrhage, seizure and stroke. CCMs arise from loss-of-function mutations in one of three genes: KRIT1 (also known as CCM1), CCM2 or PDCD10 (also known as CCM3). PDCD10 mutations in humans often result in a more severe form of the disease relative to mutations in the other two CCM genes, and PDCD10-knockout mice show severe defects, the mechanistic basis for which is unclear. We have recently reported that CCM3 regulates exocytosis mediated by the UNC13 family of exocytic regulatory proteins. Here, in investigating the role of endothelial cell exocytosis in CCM disease progression, we found that CCM3 suppresses UNC13B- and vesicle-associated membrane protein 3 (VAMP3)-dependent exocytosis of angiopoietin 2 (ANGPT2) in brain endothelial cells. CCM3 deficiency in endothelial cells augments the exocytosis and secretion of ANGPT2, which is associated with destabilized endothelial cell junctions, enlarged lumen formation and endothelial cell-pericyte dissociation. UNC13B deficiency, which blunts ANGPT2 secretion from endothelial cells, or treatment with an ANGPT2-neutralizing antibody normalizes the defects in the brain and retina caused by endothelial-cell-specific CCM3 deficiency, including the disruption of endothelial cell junctions, vessel dilation and pericyte dissociation. Thus, enhanced secretion of ANGPT2 in endothelial cells contributes to the progression of CCM disease, providing a new therapeutic approach for treating this devastating pathology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1033-1042
Number of pages10
JournalNature Medicine
Volume22
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Central Nervous System Cavernous Hemangioma
Angiopoietin-2
Endothelial cells
Exocytosis
Endothelial Cells
Pericytes
Intercellular Junctions
Mutation
Vesicle-Associated Membrane Protein 3
Brain
Genes
Central Nervous System Vascular Malformations
Defects
Gene Knockout Techniques
Cerebral Hemorrhage
Neurology
Pathology
Neutralizing Antibodies
Knockout Mice
Disease Progression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Endothelial exocytosis of angiopoietin-2 resulting from CCM3 deficiency contributes to cerebral cavernous malformation. / Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Qin, Lingfeng; Zhang, Haifeng; Tang, Wenwen; Ji, Weidong; He, Yun; Liang, Xiaoling; Wang, Zongren; Yuan, Qianying; Vortmeyer, Alexander; Toomre, Derek; Fuh, Germaine; Yan, Minghong; Kluger, Martin S.; Wu, Dianqing; Min, Wang.

In: Nature Medicine, Vol. 22, No. 9, 01.09.2016, p. 1033-1042.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zhou, HJ, Qin, L, Zhang, H, Tang, W, Ji, W, He, Y, Liang, X, Wang, Z, Yuan, Q, Vortmeyer, A, Toomre, D, Fuh, G, Yan, M, Kluger, MS, Wu, D & Min, W 2016, 'Endothelial exocytosis of angiopoietin-2 resulting from CCM3 deficiency contributes to cerebral cavernous malformation', Nature Medicine, vol. 22, no. 9, pp. 1033-1042. https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.4169
Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny ; Qin, Lingfeng ; Zhang, Haifeng ; Tang, Wenwen ; Ji, Weidong ; He, Yun ; Liang, Xiaoling ; Wang, Zongren ; Yuan, Qianying ; Vortmeyer, Alexander ; Toomre, Derek ; Fuh, Germaine ; Yan, Minghong ; Kluger, Martin S. ; Wu, Dianqing ; Min, Wang. / Endothelial exocytosis of angiopoietin-2 resulting from CCM3 deficiency contributes to cerebral cavernous malformation. In: Nature Medicine. 2016 ; Vol. 22, No. 9. pp. 1033-1042.
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abstract = "Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular malformations that affect the central nervous system and result in cerebral hemorrhage, seizure and stroke. CCMs arise from loss-of-function mutations in one of three genes: KRIT1 (also known as CCM1), CCM2 or PDCD10 (also known as CCM3). PDCD10 mutations in humans often result in a more severe form of the disease relative to mutations in the other two CCM genes, and PDCD10-knockout mice show severe defects, the mechanistic basis for which is unclear. We have recently reported that CCM3 regulates exocytosis mediated by the UNC13 family of exocytic regulatory proteins. Here, in investigating the role of endothelial cell exocytosis in CCM disease progression, we found that CCM3 suppresses UNC13B- and vesicle-associated membrane protein 3 (VAMP3)-dependent exocytosis of angiopoietin 2 (ANGPT2) in brain endothelial cells. CCM3 deficiency in endothelial cells augments the exocytosis and secretion of ANGPT2, which is associated with destabilized endothelial cell junctions, enlarged lumen formation and endothelial cell-pericyte dissociation. UNC13B deficiency, which blunts ANGPT2 secretion from endothelial cells, or treatment with an ANGPT2-neutralizing antibody normalizes the defects in the brain and retina caused by endothelial-cell-specific CCM3 deficiency, including the disruption of endothelial cell junctions, vessel dilation and pericyte dissociation. Thus, enhanced secretion of ANGPT2 in endothelial cells contributes to the progression of CCM disease, providing a new therapeutic approach for treating this devastating pathology.",
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AU - Liang, Xiaoling

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AU - Vortmeyer, Alexander

AU - Toomre, Derek

AU - Fuh, Germaine

AU - Yan, Minghong

AU - Kluger, Martin S.

AU - Wu, Dianqing

AU - Min, Wang

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AB - Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular malformations that affect the central nervous system and result in cerebral hemorrhage, seizure and stroke. CCMs arise from loss-of-function mutations in one of three genes: KRIT1 (also known as CCM1), CCM2 or PDCD10 (also known as CCM3). PDCD10 mutations in humans often result in a more severe form of the disease relative to mutations in the other two CCM genes, and PDCD10-knockout mice show severe defects, the mechanistic basis for which is unclear. We have recently reported that CCM3 regulates exocytosis mediated by the UNC13 family of exocytic regulatory proteins. Here, in investigating the role of endothelial cell exocytosis in CCM disease progression, we found that CCM3 suppresses UNC13B- and vesicle-associated membrane protein 3 (VAMP3)-dependent exocytosis of angiopoietin 2 (ANGPT2) in brain endothelial cells. CCM3 deficiency in endothelial cells augments the exocytosis and secretion of ANGPT2, which is associated with destabilized endothelial cell junctions, enlarged lumen formation and endothelial cell-pericyte dissociation. UNC13B deficiency, which blunts ANGPT2 secretion from endothelial cells, or treatment with an ANGPT2-neutralizing antibody normalizes the defects in the brain and retina caused by endothelial-cell-specific CCM3 deficiency, including the disruption of endothelial cell junctions, vessel dilation and pericyte dissociation. Thus, enhanced secretion of ANGPT2 in endothelial cells contributes to the progression of CCM disease, providing a new therapeutic approach for treating this devastating pathology.

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