Endovascular treatment and radiographic follow-up of proximal traumatic intracranial aneurysms in adolescents: Case series and review of the literature

Daniel H. Fulkerson, Jason M. Voorhies, Shannon P. McCanna, Troy D. Payner, Thomas J. Leipzig, John A. Scott, Andrew J. Denardo, Kathleen Redelman, Terry G. Horner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Traumatic intracranial aneurysms are rare lesions that are relatively more common in the pediatric population. Proximal traumatic aneurysms occur near the skull base. Direct surgical repair of these lesions is difficult due to the anatomically confined area, clinical status of a head injury patient, and the transmural nature of the injury. These lesions often lack a definable neck or wall suitable for clipping. While the indications and capabilities of endovascular treatment continue to expand, there are unanswered questions about the durability of treatment, especially in young patients. There are few reports examining the radiographic outcomes of endovascular treatment specifically for traumatic intracranial aneurysms. Therefore, we examined our experience treating these rare proximal lesions in an adolescent population. Methods: A retrospective review of prospectively collected data from 2000-2008 in a large, multidisciplinary neurovascular and trauma center was performed. Results: Three pediatric patients received endovascular treatment for traumatic intracranial aneurysms near the skull base. All patients had successful obliteration of their lesion without vessel sacrifice; however, two patients required multiple procedures for coil compaction or refilling of the aneurysm. There were no complications or ischemic events related to treatment. Follow-up imaging ranged from 6 months to 3.5 years. Conclusions: Traumatic intracranial aneurysms at the skull base can be successfully treated with endovascular methods; however, close follow-up is necessary.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)613-620
Number of pages8
JournalChild's Nervous System
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2010

Fingerprint

Intracranial Aneurysm
Skull Base
Aneurysm
Pediatrics
Therapeutics
Trauma Centers
Craniocerebral Trauma
Population
Neck
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Endovascular
  • Pediatric neurosurgery
  • Pseudoaneurysm
  • Skull base
  • Trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Endovascular treatment and radiographic follow-up of proximal traumatic intracranial aneurysms in adolescents : Case series and review of the literature. / Fulkerson, Daniel H.; Voorhies, Jason M.; McCanna, Shannon P.; Payner, Troy D.; Leipzig, Thomas J.; Scott, John A.; Denardo, Andrew J.; Redelman, Kathleen; Horner, Terry G.

In: Child's Nervous System, Vol. 26, No. 5, 05.2010, p. 613-620.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fulkerson, DH, Voorhies, JM, McCanna, SP, Payner, TD, Leipzig, TJ, Scott, JA, Denardo, AJ, Redelman, K & Horner, TG 2010, 'Endovascular treatment and radiographic follow-up of proximal traumatic intracranial aneurysms in adolescents: Case series and review of the literature', Child's Nervous System, vol. 26, no. 5, pp. 613-620. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00381-010-1104-3
Fulkerson, Daniel H. ; Voorhies, Jason M. ; McCanna, Shannon P. ; Payner, Troy D. ; Leipzig, Thomas J. ; Scott, John A. ; Denardo, Andrew J. ; Redelman, Kathleen ; Horner, Terry G. / Endovascular treatment and radiographic follow-up of proximal traumatic intracranial aneurysms in adolescents : Case series and review of the literature. In: Child's Nervous System. 2010 ; Vol. 26, No. 5. pp. 613-620.
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