ENT experience in a family medicine clerkship

Is there enough?

Brenda S. OHara, Robert M. Saywell, Terrell W. Zollinger, Christopher P. Smith, Jennifer L. Burba, David M. Stopperich

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: Curriculum planning is an essential process at any institution of learning. Currently, at Indiana University, a 1-week required otorhinolaryngology clerkship is being considered for removal from the curriculum, and this exposure is planned for integration into other primary care clerkships. A data collection system for patient encounters was created to obtain objective quantitative data about ear, nose, and throat conditions in the family medicine clerkship. Methods: A total of 445 students filled out 56,151 patient encounter forms that contained the diagnoses, patient age, student comfort levels, and student responsibilities. Results: Of the 56,151 encounters, 22.9% involved a condition involving an ear, nose, or throat (ENT) diagnosis, and the overall top-10 diagnoses reflect a typical family practice. Few students reported being given the opportunity to perform procedures. Conclusions: It appears that students are receiving sufficient practice in taking patient histories and performing initial patient physicals for ENT cases and that they see a sufficient number of ENT cases. However, students had more limited opportunity to perform and/or assist with ENT procedures or to be involved with patient education and ENT counseling. The number of ENT cases in the third-year clerkship is sufficient, and the experience is mostly more than adequate. Our study indicates that ENT training is a significant part of the family medicine clerkship, and curriculum integration is possible, though concerns about procedural skills will need to be addressed.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)691-695
    Number of pages5
    JournalFamily Medicine
    Volume32
    Issue number10
    StatePublished - 2000

    Fingerprint

    Pharynx
    Nose
    Ear
    Medicine
    Students
    Curriculum
    Family Practice
    Otolaryngology
    Patient Education
    Information Systems
    Counseling
    Primary Health Care
    Learning

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

    Cite this

    OHara, B. S., Saywell, R. M., Zollinger, T. W., Smith, C. P., Burba, J. L., & Stopperich, D. M. (2000). ENT experience in a family medicine clerkship: Is there enough? Family Medicine, 32(10), 691-695.

    ENT experience in a family medicine clerkship : Is there enough? / OHara, Brenda S.; Saywell, Robert M.; Zollinger, Terrell W.; Smith, Christopher P.; Burba, Jennifer L.; Stopperich, David M.

    In: Family Medicine, Vol. 32, No. 10, 2000, p. 691-695.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    OHara, BS, Saywell, RM, Zollinger, TW, Smith, CP, Burba, JL & Stopperich, DM 2000, 'ENT experience in a family medicine clerkship: Is there enough?', Family Medicine, vol. 32, no. 10, pp. 691-695.
    OHara BS, Saywell RM, Zollinger TW, Smith CP, Burba JL, Stopperich DM. ENT experience in a family medicine clerkship: Is there enough? Family Medicine. 2000;32(10):691-695.
    OHara, Brenda S. ; Saywell, Robert M. ; Zollinger, Terrell W. ; Smith, Christopher P. ; Burba, Jennifer L. ; Stopperich, David M. / ENT experience in a family medicine clerkship : Is there enough?. In: Family Medicine. 2000 ; Vol. 32, No. 10. pp. 691-695.
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    abstract = "Background: Curriculum planning is an essential process at any institution of learning. Currently, at Indiana University, a 1-week required otorhinolaryngology clerkship is being considered for removal from the curriculum, and this exposure is planned for integration into other primary care clerkships. A data collection system for patient encounters was created to obtain objective quantitative data about ear, nose, and throat conditions in the family medicine clerkship. Methods: A total of 445 students filled out 56,151 patient encounter forms that contained the diagnoses, patient age, student comfort levels, and student responsibilities. Results: Of the 56,151 encounters, 22.9{\%} involved a condition involving an ear, nose, or throat (ENT) diagnosis, and the overall top-10 diagnoses reflect a typical family practice. Few students reported being given the opportunity to perform procedures. Conclusions: It appears that students are receiving sufficient practice in taking patient histories and performing initial patient physicals for ENT cases and that they see a sufficient number of ENT cases. However, students had more limited opportunity to perform and/or assist with ENT procedures or to be involved with patient education and ENT counseling. The number of ENT cases in the third-year clerkship is sufficient, and the experience is mostly more than adequate. Our study indicates that ENT training is a significant part of the family medicine clerkship, and curriculum integration is possible, though concerns about procedural skills will need to be addressed.",
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