Environmental Decontamination of a Chemical Warfare Simulant Utilizing a Membrane Vesicle-Encapsulated Phosphotriesterase

Nathan Alves, Martin Moore, Brandy J. Johnson, Scott N. Dean, Kendrick B. Turner, Igor L. Medintz, Scott A. Walper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While technologies for the remediation of chemical contaminants continue to emerge, growing interest in green technologies has led researchers to explore natural catalytic mechanisms derived from microbial species. One such method, enzymatic degradation, offers an alternative to harsh chemical catalysts and resins. Recombinant enzymes, however, are often too labile or show limited activity when challenged with nonideal environmental conditions that may vary in salinity, pH, or other physical properties. Here, we demonstrate how phosphotriesterase encapsulated in a bacterial outer membrane vesicle can be used to degrade the organophosphate chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulant paraoxon in environmental water samples. We also carried out remediation assays on solid surfaces, including glass, painted metal, and fabric, that were selected as representative materials, which could potentially be contaminated with a CWA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15712-15719
Number of pages8
JournalUnknown Journal
Volume10
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - May 9 2018

Fingerprint

Phosphoric Triester Hydrolases
Chemical Warfare
Chemical Warfare Agents
Chemical warfare
Decontamination
Remediation
Paraoxon
Environmental technology
Technology
Membranes
Organophosphates
Salinity
Glass
Assays
Enzymes
Resins
Physical properties
Metals
Research Personnel
Impurities

Keywords

  • bioremediation
  • chemical warfare agents
  • decontamination
  • enzyme
  • organophosphate
  • outer membrane vesicles
  • phosphotriesterase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Alves, N., Moore, M., Johnson, B. J., Dean, S. N., Turner, K. B., Medintz, I. L., & Walper, S. A. (2018). Environmental Decontamination of a Chemical Warfare Simulant Utilizing a Membrane Vesicle-Encapsulated Phosphotriesterase. Unknown Journal, 10(18), 15712-15719. https://doi.org/10.1021/acsami.8b02717

Environmental Decontamination of a Chemical Warfare Simulant Utilizing a Membrane Vesicle-Encapsulated Phosphotriesterase. / Alves, Nathan; Moore, Martin; Johnson, Brandy J.; Dean, Scott N.; Turner, Kendrick B.; Medintz, Igor L.; Walper, Scott A.

In: Unknown Journal, Vol. 10, No. 18, 09.05.2018, p. 15712-15719.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alves, Nathan ; Moore, Martin ; Johnson, Brandy J. ; Dean, Scott N. ; Turner, Kendrick B. ; Medintz, Igor L. ; Walper, Scott A. / Environmental Decontamination of a Chemical Warfare Simulant Utilizing a Membrane Vesicle-Encapsulated Phosphotriesterase. In: Unknown Journal. 2018 ; Vol. 10, No. 18. pp. 15712-15719.
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