Environmental factors and health information technology management strategy

Nir Menachemi, Dong Yeong Shin, Eric W. Ford, Feliciano Yu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Previous studies have provided theoretical and empirical evidence that environmental forces influence hospital strategy. PURPOSES: Rooted in resource dependence theory and the information uncertainty perspective, this study examined the relationship between environmental market characteristics and hospitals' selection of a health information technology (HIT) management strategy. METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: A cross-sectional design is used to analyze secondary data from the American Hospital Association Annual Survey, the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society Analytics Database, and the Area Resource File. Univariate and multinomial logistic regression analyses are used. FINDINGS: Overall, 3,221 hospitals were studied, of which 60.9% pursed a single-vendor HIT management strategy, 28.9% pursued a best-of-suite strategy, and 10.2% used a best-of-breed strategy. Multivariate analyses controlling for hospital characteristics found that measures of environmental factors representing munificence, dynamism, and/or complexity were systematically associated with various hospital HIT management strategy use. Specifically, the number of generalist physicians per capita was positively associated with the single-vendor strategy (B =-5.64, p =.10). Hospitals in urban markets were more likely to pursue the best-of-suite strategy (B = 0.622, p <.001). Dynamism, measured as the number of managed care contracts for a given hospital, was negatively associated with the single-vendor strategy (B = 0.004, p =.049). Lastly, complexity, measured as market competition, was positively associated with the best-of-breed strategy (B = 0.623, p =.042). PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: By and large, environmental factors are associated with hospital HIT management strategies in mostly theoretically supported ways. Hospital leaders and policy makers interested in influencing the adoption of hospital HIT should consider how market conditions influence HIT management decisions as part of programs to promote meaningful use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)275-285
Number of pages11
JournalHealth Care Management Review
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Health Information Management
Medical Informatics
Environmental Health
American Hospital Association
Management Information Systems
Information Theory
Health Care Surveys
Environmental health
Management strategy
Health information technology
Environmental factors
Information technology management
Urban Hospitals
Managed Care Programs
Contracts
Administrative Personnel
Uncertainty
Multivariate Analysis
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • complexity
  • dynamism
  • environmental factors
  • health information technology
  • hospital strategy
  • munificence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management
  • Health Policy
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

Environmental factors and health information technology management strategy. / Menachemi, Nir; Shin, Dong Yeong; Ford, Eric W.; Yu, Feliciano.

In: Health Care Management Review, Vol. 36, No. 3, 01.07.2011, p. 275-285.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Menachemi, Nir ; Shin, Dong Yeong ; Ford, Eric W. ; Yu, Feliciano. / Environmental factors and health information technology management strategy. In: Health Care Management Review. 2011 ; Vol. 36, No. 3. pp. 275-285.
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