Erosion protection by calcium lactate/sodium fluoride rinses under different salivary flows in vitro

Alessandra B. Borges, Taís Scaramucci, Frank Lippert, Domenick Zero, Anderson Hara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated the effect of a calcium lactate prerinse on sodium fluoride protection in an in vitro erosion-remineralization model simulating two different salivary flow rates. Enamel and dentin specimens were randomly assigned to 6 groups (n = 8), according to the combination between rinse treatments - deionized water (DIW), 12 mM NaF (NaF) or 150 mM calcium lactate followed by NaF (CaL + NaF) - and unstimulated salivary flow rates - 0.5 or 0.05 ml/min - simulating normal and low salivary flow rates, respectively. The specimens were placed into custom-made devices, creating a sealed chamber on the specimen surface connected to a peristaltic pump. Citric acid was injected into the chamber for 2 min, followed by artificial saliva (0.5 or 0.05 ml/min) for 60 min. This cycle was repeated 4×/day for 3 days. Rinse treatments were performed daily 30 min after the 1st and 4th erosive challenges, for 1 min each time. Surface loss was determined by optical profilometry. KOH-soluble fluoride and structurally bound fluoride were determined in specimens at the end of the experiment. Data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (α = 0.05). NaF and CaL + NaF exhibited significantly lower enamel and dentin loss than DIW, with no difference between them for normal flow conditions. The low salivary flow rate increased enamel and dentin loss, except for CaL + NaF, which presented overall higher KOH-soluble and structurally bound fluoride levels. The results suggest that the NaF rinse was able to reduce erosion progression. Although the CaL prerinse considerably increased F availability, it enhanced NaF protection against dentin erosion only under hyposalivatory conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)193-199
Number of pages7
JournalCaries Research
Volume48
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Sodium Fluoride
Dentin
Dental Enamel
Fluorides
Artificial Saliva
Water Purification
Citric Acid
Analysis of Variance
Equipment and Supplies
calcium lactate
In Vitro Techniques
Water

Keywords

  • Calcium
  • Dentin
  • Enamel
  • Erosion
  • Fluoride
  • Optical profilometry
  • Salivary flow rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Erosion protection by calcium lactate/sodium fluoride rinses under different salivary flows in vitro. / Borges, Alessandra B.; Scaramucci, Taís; Lippert, Frank; Zero, Domenick; Hara, Anderson.

In: Caries Research, Vol. 48, No. 3, 2014, p. 193-199.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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