Esophageal button battery ingestions

Decreasing time to operative intervention by level i trauma activation

Robert T. Russell, Russell L. Griffin, Elizabeth Weinstein, Deborah F. Billmire

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose The incidence of button battery ingestions is increasing and injury due to esophageal impaction begins within minutes of exposure. We changed our management algorithm for suspected button battery ingestions with intent to reduce time to evaluation and operative removal. Methods A retrospective study was performed to identify and evaluate time to treatment and outcome for all esophageal button battery ingestions presenting to a major children's hospital emergency room from February 1, 2010 through February 1, 2012. During the first year, standard emergency room triage (ST) was used. During the second year, the triage protocol was changed and Trauma I triage (TT) was used. Results 24 children had suspected button battery ingestions with 11 having esophageal impaction. One esophageal impaction was due to 2 stacked coins. Time from arrival in emergency room to battery removal was 183 minutes in ST group (n = 4) and 33 minutes in TT group (n = 7) (p = 0.04). One patient in ST developed a tracheoesophageal fistula. There were no complications in the TT group. Conclusions The use of Trauma 1 activations for suspected button battery ingestions has led to more expedient evaluation and shortened time to removal of impacted esophageal batteries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1360-1362
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Pediatric Surgery
Volume49
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Triage
Operative Time
Eating
Wounds and Injuries
Hospital Emergency Service
Tracheoesophageal Fistula
Numismatics
Retrospective Studies
Incidence

Keywords

  • Button battery
  • Esophagus
  • Level I trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Esophageal button battery ingestions : Decreasing time to operative intervention by level i trauma activation. / Russell, Robert T.; Griffin, Russell L.; Weinstein, Elizabeth; Billmire, Deborah F.

In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery, Vol. 49, No. 9, 2014, p. 1360-1362.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Russell, Robert T. ; Griffin, Russell L. ; Weinstein, Elizabeth ; Billmire, Deborah F. / Esophageal button battery ingestions : Decreasing time to operative intervention by level i trauma activation. In: Journal of Pediatric Surgery. 2014 ; Vol. 49, No. 9. pp. 1360-1362.
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