Esophageal cancer

Mimi Ceppa, Thomas A. D’Amico

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Introduction The incidence of esophageal carcinoma is increasing, with the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma increasing faster than any other malignancy in the United States (1). Estimates for 2013 predict 17990 new cases of esophageal carcinoma, accounting for 15210 deaths (2). While the incidence of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus is decreasing by 3.6% per year, the incidence of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus is increasing by 2.1% per year (3). Adenocarcinoma of the esophagus The most important risk factor for the development of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus is the presence of columnar-lined esophagus (CLE), or Barrett's esophagus (4). CLE is present in approximately 10% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux (5) and it is estimated that up to 90% of all esophageal adenocarcinomas arise from CLE. The presence of CLE is associated with an increased risk of adenocarcinoma by a factor of between 30 and 125 (4,6). LOH data Loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) studies of specific oncogenes involved in the neoplastic progression of the esophagus have identiied important loss of function atmultiple sites (7–11). In a study performed on 23 cases of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus the chromosomal abnormalitieswith the highest incidence of LOH were 3p (64%), 5q (45%), 9p (52%), 11p (61%), 13q (50%), 17p (96%), 17q (55%), and 18q (70%; 71).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMolecular Oncology: Causes of Cancer and Targets for Treatment
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages526-531
Number of pages6
ISBN (Print)9781139046947, 9780521876629
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Esophageal Neoplasms
Esophagus
Loss of Heterozygosity
Incidence
Adenocarcinoma
Carcinoma
Barrett Esophagus
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Oncogenes
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Adenocarcinoma Of Esophagus
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Ceppa, M., & D’Amico, T. A. (2015). Esophageal cancer. In Molecular Oncology: Causes of Cancer and Targets for Treatment (pp. 526-531). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139046947.045

Esophageal cancer. / Ceppa, Mimi; D’Amico, Thomas A.

Molecular Oncology: Causes of Cancer and Targets for Treatment. Cambridge University Press, 2015. p. 526-531.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Ceppa, M & D’Amico, TA 2015, Esophageal cancer. in Molecular Oncology: Causes of Cancer and Targets for Treatment. Cambridge University Press, pp. 526-531. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139046947.045
Ceppa M, D’Amico TA. Esophageal cancer. In Molecular Oncology: Causes of Cancer and Targets for Treatment. Cambridge University Press. 2015. p. 526-531 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139046947.045
Ceppa, Mimi ; D’Amico, Thomas A. / Esophageal cancer. Molecular Oncology: Causes of Cancer and Targets for Treatment. Cambridge University Press, 2015. pp. 526-531
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