Establishment of safety paradigms and trust in emerging adult relationships

Margo Mullinax, Stephanie Sanders, Jenny Higgins, Barbara Dennis, Michael Reece, J. Fortenberry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is a critical need to understand the interplay between relationship trust and public health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to develop an understanding of emerging adult women’s processes of establishing trust in sexual relationships. Twenty-five women aged 18–24 years participated in semi-structured interviews. Throughout the interviews, women compared and contrasted experiences in which they felt comfortable engaging in sexual intercourse with a partner versus times in which they did not feel comfortable. Analysis was based on a critical qualitative research orientation. When asked to speak to instances when they felt comfortable having sex, most women spoke about relationship trust. Many participants conceptualised trust based on past experiences with bad relationships or sexual violence. Based on their previous experiences of feeling unsafe or undervalued, emotional and physical security became prioritised in relationship development. Trust was developed through friendship, communication over time, and through shared life experiences. This research is among the first to qualitatively investigate trust formation and other impersonal dynamics related to sexual health decision-making. Insights from this study should be translated into future action by public health practitioners to promote healthy sexual relationships and communication about sexual health topics as a form of trust building.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalCulture, Health and Sexuality
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Mar 2 2016

Fingerprint

paradigm
Safety
experience
public health
Reproductive Health
communication
Public Health
interview
health
Communication
friendship
Interviews
sexual violence
qualitative research
Qualitative Research
Coitus
Life Change Events
Sex Offenses
decision making
Decision Making

Keywords

  • condoms
  • contraception
  • decision-making
  • Relationships
  • young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Establishment of safety paradigms and trust in emerging adult relationships. / Mullinax, Margo; Sanders, Stephanie; Higgins, Jenny; Dennis, Barbara; Reece, Michael; Fortenberry, J.

In: Culture, Health and Sexuality, 02.03.2016, p. 1-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mullinax, Margo ; Sanders, Stephanie ; Higgins, Jenny ; Dennis, Barbara ; Reece, Michael ; Fortenberry, J. / Establishment of safety paradigms and trust in emerging adult relationships. In: Culture, Health and Sexuality. 2016 ; pp. 1-16.
@article{74cd62402b8247b08799d94244965f88,
title = "Establishment of safety paradigms and trust in emerging adult relationships",
abstract = "There is a critical need to understand the interplay between relationship trust and public health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to develop an understanding of emerging adult women’s processes of establishing trust in sexual relationships. Twenty-five women aged 18–24 years participated in semi-structured interviews. Throughout the interviews, women compared and contrasted experiences in which they felt comfortable engaging in sexual intercourse with a partner versus times in which they did not feel comfortable. Analysis was based on a critical qualitative research orientation. When asked to speak to instances when they felt comfortable having sex, most women spoke about relationship trust. Many participants conceptualised trust based on past experiences with bad relationships or sexual violence. Based on their previous experiences of feeling unsafe or undervalued, emotional and physical security became prioritised in relationship development. Trust was developed through friendship, communication over time, and through shared life experiences. This research is among the first to qualitatively investigate trust formation and other impersonal dynamics related to sexual health decision-making. Insights from this study should be translated into future action by public health practitioners to promote healthy sexual relationships and communication about sexual health topics as a form of trust building.",
keywords = "condoms, contraception, decision-making, Relationships, young adults",
author = "Margo Mullinax and Stephanie Sanders and Jenny Higgins and Barbara Dennis and Michael Reece and J. Fortenberry",
year = "2016",
month = "3",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1080/13691058.2016.1148779",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "1--16",
journal = "Culture, Health and Sexuality",
issn = "1369-1058",
publisher = "Routledge",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Establishment of safety paradigms and trust in emerging adult relationships

AU - Mullinax, Margo

AU - Sanders, Stephanie

AU - Higgins, Jenny

AU - Dennis, Barbara

AU - Reece, Michael

AU - Fortenberry, J.

PY - 2016/3/2

Y1 - 2016/3/2

N2 - There is a critical need to understand the interplay between relationship trust and public health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to develop an understanding of emerging adult women’s processes of establishing trust in sexual relationships. Twenty-five women aged 18–24 years participated in semi-structured interviews. Throughout the interviews, women compared and contrasted experiences in which they felt comfortable engaging in sexual intercourse with a partner versus times in which they did not feel comfortable. Analysis was based on a critical qualitative research orientation. When asked to speak to instances when they felt comfortable having sex, most women spoke about relationship trust. Many participants conceptualised trust based on past experiences with bad relationships or sexual violence. Based on their previous experiences of feeling unsafe or undervalued, emotional and physical security became prioritised in relationship development. Trust was developed through friendship, communication over time, and through shared life experiences. This research is among the first to qualitatively investigate trust formation and other impersonal dynamics related to sexual health decision-making. Insights from this study should be translated into future action by public health practitioners to promote healthy sexual relationships and communication about sexual health topics as a form of trust building.

AB - There is a critical need to understand the interplay between relationship trust and public health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to develop an understanding of emerging adult women’s processes of establishing trust in sexual relationships. Twenty-five women aged 18–24 years participated in semi-structured interviews. Throughout the interviews, women compared and contrasted experiences in which they felt comfortable engaging in sexual intercourse with a partner versus times in which they did not feel comfortable. Analysis was based on a critical qualitative research orientation. When asked to speak to instances when they felt comfortable having sex, most women spoke about relationship trust. Many participants conceptualised trust based on past experiences with bad relationships or sexual violence. Based on their previous experiences of feeling unsafe or undervalued, emotional and physical security became prioritised in relationship development. Trust was developed through friendship, communication over time, and through shared life experiences. This research is among the first to qualitatively investigate trust formation and other impersonal dynamics related to sexual health decision-making. Insights from this study should be translated into future action by public health practitioners to promote healthy sexual relationships and communication about sexual health topics as a form of trust building.

KW - condoms

KW - contraception

KW - decision-making

KW - Relationships

KW - young adults

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84961198971&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84961198971&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/13691058.2016.1148779

DO - 10.1080/13691058.2016.1148779

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 16

JO - Culture, Health and Sexuality

JF - Culture, Health and Sexuality

SN - 1369-1058

ER -