Estimating alcohol content of traditional brew in Western Kenya using culturally relevant methods: The case for cost over volume

Rebecca K. Papas, John Sidle, Emmanuel S. Wamalwa, Thomas O. Okumu, Kendall L. Bryant, Joseph L. Goulet, Stephen A. Maisto, R. Scott Braithwaite, Amy C. Justice

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Traditional homemade brew is believed to represent the highest proportion of alcohol use in sub-Saharan Africa. In Eldoret, Kenya, two types of brew are common: chang'aa, spirits, and busaa, maize beer. Local residents refer to the amount of brew consumed by the amount of money spent, suggesting a culturally relevant estimation method. The purposes of this study were to analyze ethanol content of chang'aa and busaa; and to compare two methods of alcohol estimation: use by cost, and use by volume, the latter the current international standard. Laboratory results showed mean ethanol content was 34% (SD = 14%) for chang'aa and 4% (SD = 1%) for busaa. Standard drink unit equivalents for chang'aa and busaa, respectively, were 2 and 1.3 (US) and 3.5 and 2.3 (Great Britain). Using a computational approach, both methods demonstrated comparable results. We conclude that cost estimation of alcohol content is more culturally relevant and does not differ in accuracy from the international standard.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)836-844
Number of pages9
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Kenya
Alcohols
Costs and Cost Analysis
Ethanol
Africa South of the Sahara
Zea mays

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Cognitive behavioral treatment
  • HIV
  • Kenya
  • Traditional brew

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Estimating alcohol content of traditional brew in Western Kenya using culturally relevant methods : The case for cost over volume. / Papas, Rebecca K.; Sidle, John; Wamalwa, Emmanuel S.; Okumu, Thomas O.; Bryant, Kendall L.; Goulet, Joseph L.; Maisto, Stephen A.; Braithwaite, R. Scott; Justice, Amy C.

In: AIDS and Behavior, Vol. 14, No. 4, 08.2010, p. 836-844.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Papas, RK, Sidle, J, Wamalwa, ES, Okumu, TO, Bryant, KL, Goulet, JL, Maisto, SA, Braithwaite, RS & Justice, AC 2010, 'Estimating alcohol content of traditional brew in Western Kenya using culturally relevant methods: The case for cost over volume', AIDS and Behavior, vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 836-844. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-008-9492-z
Papas, Rebecca K. ; Sidle, John ; Wamalwa, Emmanuel S. ; Okumu, Thomas O. ; Bryant, Kendall L. ; Goulet, Joseph L. ; Maisto, Stephen A. ; Braithwaite, R. Scott ; Justice, Amy C. / Estimating alcohol content of traditional brew in Western Kenya using culturally relevant methods : The case for cost over volume. In: AIDS and Behavior. 2010 ; Vol. 14, No. 4. pp. 836-844.
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