Evaluation of an isogenic hemolysin-deficient mutant in the human model of Haemophilus ducreyi infection

K. L. Palmer, A. C. Thornton, K. R. Fortney, A. F. Hood, R. S. Munson, Stanley Spinola

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Haemophilus ducreyi causes the genital ulcerative disease chancroid. One putative virulence factor of H. ducreyi is a pore-forming hemolysin that displays toxicity against human fibroblasts and keratinocytes. In order to test the role of the hemolysin in pathogenesis, an isogenic hemolysin- deficient mutant was constructed, designated 35000HP-RSM1. The lipooligosaccharide, outer membrane protein patterns, and growth attributes of 35000HP-RSM1 were identical to its parent, 35000HP. Human subjects were challenged on the upper arm with the isogenic isolates in a double-blinded, randomized, escalating dose-response study. Pustules developed at a similar rate at sites inoculated with the mutant or parent. The cellular infiltrate and bacterial load in lesions were also similar. These results indicate the hemolysin does not play a role in pustule formation. Due to the limitations of this model, the role of the hemolysin at later stages of infection could not be determined.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)191-199
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume178
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1998

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Haemophilus ducreyi
Haemophilus Infections
Hemolysin Proteins
Chancroid
Complement Factor H
Bacterial Load
Virulence Factors
Keratinocytes
Membrane Proteins
Arm
Fibroblasts
Growth
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

Cite this

Palmer, K. L., Thornton, A. C., Fortney, K. R., Hood, A. F., Munson, R. S., & Spinola, S. (1998). Evaluation of an isogenic hemolysin-deficient mutant in the human model of Haemophilus ducreyi infection. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 178(1), 191-199.

Evaluation of an isogenic hemolysin-deficient mutant in the human model of Haemophilus ducreyi infection. / Palmer, K. L.; Thornton, A. C.; Fortney, K. R.; Hood, A. F.; Munson, R. S.; Spinola, Stanley.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 178, No. 1, 1998, p. 191-199.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Palmer, KL, Thornton, AC, Fortney, KR, Hood, AF, Munson, RS & Spinola, S 1998, 'Evaluation of an isogenic hemolysin-deficient mutant in the human model of Haemophilus ducreyi infection', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 178, no. 1, pp. 191-199.
Palmer, K. L. ; Thornton, A. C. ; Fortney, K. R. ; Hood, A. F. ; Munson, R. S. ; Spinola, Stanley. / Evaluation of an isogenic hemolysin-deficient mutant in the human model of Haemophilus ducreyi infection. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1998 ; Vol. 178, No. 1. pp. 191-199.
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