Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

Are we there yet?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is a very ambitious idea that would have major implications in the areas of stem cell transplantation and somatic gene therapy. However, successful ex vivo expansion has evaded and frustrated scientists for a number of years. The goal of ex vivo expansion is to induce cell division and proliferation of stem cells while maintaining their primary functional characteristic, namely, their ability to engraft and sustain long-term hematopoiesis. Only when a balance between these two requirements is reached can ex vivo expansion of stem cells be considered successful. Establishing such a balance has not been easy. However, many lessons have been learned along the way, and today we have a more profound understanding of the potential obstacles facing ex vivo expansion than we did only a few years ago. In this review, we discuss these obstacles and evaluate the current status of ex vivo expansion of stem and progenitor cells both from the perspective of basic stem cell biology and from the viewpoint of clinical utility of these cells in transplantation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)93-102
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Hematotherapy
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999

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Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Stem Cells
Cell Transplantation
Hematopoiesis
Stem Cell Transplantation
Genetic Therapy
Cell Division
Cell Biology
Cell Proliferation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Immunology

Cite this

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abstract = "Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is a very ambitious idea that would have major implications in the areas of stem cell transplantation and somatic gene therapy. However, successful ex vivo expansion has evaded and frustrated scientists for a number of years. The goal of ex vivo expansion is to induce cell division and proliferation of stem cells while maintaining their primary functional characteristic, namely, their ability to engraft and sustain long-term hematopoiesis. Only when a balance between these two requirements is reached can ex vivo expansion of stem cells be considered successful. Establishing such a balance has not been easy. However, many lessons have been learned along the way, and today we have a more profound understanding of the potential obstacles facing ex vivo expansion than we did only a few years ago. In this review, we discuss these obstacles and evaluate the current status of ex vivo expansion of stem and progenitor cells both from the perspective of basic stem cell biology and from the viewpoint of clinical utility of these cells in transplantation.",
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AU - Srour, Edward

AU - Abonour, Rafat

AU - Cornetta, Kenneth

AU - Orschell, Christie

PY - 1999

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