Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells: Are we there yet?

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is a very ambitious idea that would have major implications in the areas of stem cell transplantation and somatic gene therapy. However, successful ex vivo expansion has evaded and frustrated scientists for a number of years. The goal of ex vivo expansion is to induce cell division and proliferation of stem cells while maintaining their primary functional characteristic, namely, their ability to engraft and sustain long-term hematopoiesis. Only when a balance between these two requirements is reached can ex vivo expansion of stem cells be considered successful. Establishing such a balance has not been easy. However, many lessons have been learned along the way, and today we have a more profound understanding of the potential obstacles facing ex vivo expansion than we did only a few years ago. In this review, we discuss these obstacles and evaluate the current status of ex vivo expansion of stem and progenitor cells both from the perspective of basic stem cell biology and from the viewpoint of clinical utility of these cells in transplantation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)93-102
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Hematotherapy
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Hematology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells: Are we there yet?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this