Examining the effect of peer helping in a coping skills intervention: a randomized controlled trial for advanced gastrointestinal cancer patients and their family caregivers

Catherine E. Mosher, Ekin Secinti, Shelley Johns, Bert H. O’Neil, Paul Helft, Safi Shahda, Shadia Jalal, Victoria Champion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: At the end of life, spiritual well-being is a central aspect of quality of life for many patients and their family caregivers. A prevalent spiritual value in advanced cancer patients is the need to actively give. To address this need, the current randomized trial examined whether adding a peer helping component to a coping skills intervention leads to improved meaning in life and peace for advanced gastrointestinal cancer patients and their caregivers. Feasibility and acceptability outcomes were also assessed. Methods: Advanced gastrointestinal cancer patients and caregivers (n = 50 dyads) were randomly assigned to a 5-session, telephone-based coping skills intervention or a peer helping + coping skills intervention. One or both dyad members had moderate–severe distress. Peer helping involved contributing to handouts on coping skills for other families coping with cancer. Patients and caregivers completed measures of meaning in life/peace, fatigue, psychological symptoms, coping self-efficacy, and emotional support. Patient pain and caregiver burden were also assessed. Results: Small effects in favor of the coping skills group were found regarding meaning in life/peace at 1 and 5 weeks post-intervention. Other outcomes did not vary as a function of group assignment, with both groups showing small decreases in patient and caregiver fatigue and caregiver distress and burden. High recruitment and retention rates supported feasibility, and high participant satisfaction ratings supported acceptability. Conclusions: Although a telephone-based intervention is feasible and acceptable for this population, peer helping in the context of a coping skills intervention does not enhance spiritual well-being relative to coping skills alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-14
Number of pages14
JournalQuality of Life Research
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jun 10 2017

Fingerprint

Gastrointestinal Neoplasms
Psychological Adaptation
Caregivers
Randomized Controlled Trials
Telephone
Fatigue
Self Efficacy
Neoplasms
Quality of Life
Psychology
Pain
Population

Keywords

  • Distress
  • Family caregivers
  • Gastrointestinal cancer
  • Peer helping
  • Psychosocial interventions
  • Spiritual well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{28b92bf3c6e34c5ca78d860d8102ad73,
title = "Examining the effect of peer helping in a coping skills intervention: a randomized controlled trial for advanced gastrointestinal cancer patients and their family caregivers",
abstract = "Purpose: At the end of life, spiritual well-being is a central aspect of quality of life for many patients and their family caregivers. A prevalent spiritual value in advanced cancer patients is the need to actively give. To address this need, the current randomized trial examined whether adding a peer helping component to a coping skills intervention leads to improved meaning in life and peace for advanced gastrointestinal cancer patients and their caregivers. Feasibility and acceptability outcomes were also assessed. Methods: Advanced gastrointestinal cancer patients and caregivers (n = 50 dyads) were randomly assigned to a 5-session, telephone-based coping skills intervention or a peer helping + coping skills intervention. One or both dyad members had moderate–severe distress. Peer helping involved contributing to handouts on coping skills for other families coping with cancer. Patients and caregivers completed measures of meaning in life/peace, fatigue, psychological symptoms, coping self-efficacy, and emotional support. Patient pain and caregiver burden were also assessed. Results: Small effects in favor of the coping skills group were found regarding meaning in life/peace at 1 and 5 weeks post-intervention. Other outcomes did not vary as a function of group assignment, with both groups showing small decreases in patient and caregiver fatigue and caregiver distress and burden. High recruitment and retention rates supported feasibility, and high participant satisfaction ratings supported acceptability. Conclusions: Although a telephone-based intervention is feasible and acceptable for this population, peer helping in the context of a coping skills intervention does not enhance spiritual well-being relative to coping skills alone.",
keywords = "Distress, Family caregivers, Gastrointestinal cancer, Peer helping, Psychosocial interventions, Spiritual well-being",
author = "Mosher, {Catherine E.} and Ekin Secinti and Shelley Johns and O’Neil, {Bert H.} and Paul Helft and Safi Shahda and Shadia Jalal and Victoria Champion",
year = "2017",
month = "6",
day = "10",
doi = "10.1007/s11136-017-1620-7",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "1--14",
journal = "Quality of Life Research",
issn = "0962-9343",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Examining the effect of peer helping in a coping skills intervention

T2 - a randomized controlled trial for advanced gastrointestinal cancer patients and their family caregivers

AU - Mosher, Catherine E.

AU - Secinti, Ekin

AU - Johns, Shelley

AU - O’Neil, Bert H.

AU - Helft, Paul

AU - Shahda, Safi

AU - Jalal, Shadia

AU - Champion, Victoria

PY - 2017/6/10

Y1 - 2017/6/10

N2 - Purpose: At the end of life, spiritual well-being is a central aspect of quality of life for many patients and their family caregivers. A prevalent spiritual value in advanced cancer patients is the need to actively give. To address this need, the current randomized trial examined whether adding a peer helping component to a coping skills intervention leads to improved meaning in life and peace for advanced gastrointestinal cancer patients and their caregivers. Feasibility and acceptability outcomes were also assessed. Methods: Advanced gastrointestinal cancer patients and caregivers (n = 50 dyads) were randomly assigned to a 5-session, telephone-based coping skills intervention or a peer helping + coping skills intervention. One or both dyad members had moderate–severe distress. Peer helping involved contributing to handouts on coping skills for other families coping with cancer. Patients and caregivers completed measures of meaning in life/peace, fatigue, psychological symptoms, coping self-efficacy, and emotional support. Patient pain and caregiver burden were also assessed. Results: Small effects in favor of the coping skills group were found regarding meaning in life/peace at 1 and 5 weeks post-intervention. Other outcomes did not vary as a function of group assignment, with both groups showing small decreases in patient and caregiver fatigue and caregiver distress and burden. High recruitment and retention rates supported feasibility, and high participant satisfaction ratings supported acceptability. Conclusions: Although a telephone-based intervention is feasible and acceptable for this population, peer helping in the context of a coping skills intervention does not enhance spiritual well-being relative to coping skills alone.

AB - Purpose: At the end of life, spiritual well-being is a central aspect of quality of life for many patients and their family caregivers. A prevalent spiritual value in advanced cancer patients is the need to actively give. To address this need, the current randomized trial examined whether adding a peer helping component to a coping skills intervention leads to improved meaning in life and peace for advanced gastrointestinal cancer patients and their caregivers. Feasibility and acceptability outcomes were also assessed. Methods: Advanced gastrointestinal cancer patients and caregivers (n = 50 dyads) were randomly assigned to a 5-session, telephone-based coping skills intervention or a peer helping + coping skills intervention. One or both dyad members had moderate–severe distress. Peer helping involved contributing to handouts on coping skills for other families coping with cancer. Patients and caregivers completed measures of meaning in life/peace, fatigue, psychological symptoms, coping self-efficacy, and emotional support. Patient pain and caregiver burden were also assessed. Results: Small effects in favor of the coping skills group were found regarding meaning in life/peace at 1 and 5 weeks post-intervention. Other outcomes did not vary as a function of group assignment, with both groups showing small decreases in patient and caregiver fatigue and caregiver distress and burden. High recruitment and retention rates supported feasibility, and high participant satisfaction ratings supported acceptability. Conclusions: Although a telephone-based intervention is feasible and acceptable for this population, peer helping in the context of a coping skills intervention does not enhance spiritual well-being relative to coping skills alone.

KW - Distress

KW - Family caregivers

KW - Gastrointestinal cancer

KW - Peer helping

KW - Psychosocial interventions

KW - Spiritual well-being

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85020650292&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85020650292&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11136-017-1620-7

DO - 10.1007/s11136-017-1620-7

M3 - Article

C2 - 28601957

AN - SCOPUS:85020650292

SP - 1

EP - 14

JO - Quality of Life Research

JF - Quality of Life Research

SN - 0962-9343

ER -