Excess BMI in childhood: A modifiable risk factor for type 1 diabetes development?

Christine Therese Ferrara, Susan Michelle Geyer, Yuk Fun Liu, Carmella Evans-Molina, Ingrid M. Libman, Rachel Besser, Dorothy J. Becker, Henry Rodriguez, Antoinette Moran, Stephen E. Gitelman, Maria J. Redondo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine the effect of elevated BMI over time on the progression to type 1 diabetes in youth. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Westudied 1,117 children in the TrialNet Pathway to Prevention cohort (autoantibodypositive relatives of patients with type 1 diabetes). Longitudinally accumulated BMI above the 85th age- and sex-adjusted percentile generated a cumulative excess BMI (ceBMI) index. Recursive partitioning and multivariate analyses yielded sexand age-specific ceBMI thresholds for greatest type 1 diabetes risk. RESULTS: Higher ceBMI conferred significantly greater risk of progressing to type 1 diabetes. The increased diabetes risk occurred at lower ceBMI values in children <12 years of age compared with older subjects and in females versus males. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated BMI is associated with increased risk of diabetes progression in pediatric autoantibody-positive relatives, but the effect varies by sex and age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)698-701
Number of pages4
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume40
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017

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Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Autoantibodies
Research Design
Multivariate Analysis
Pediatrics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Ferrara, C. T., Geyer, S. M., Liu, Y. F., Evans-Molina, C., Libman, I. M., Besser, R., ... Redondo, M. J. (2017). Excess BMI in childhood: A modifiable risk factor for type 1 diabetes development? Diabetes Care, 40(5), 698-701. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc16-2331

Excess BMI in childhood : A modifiable risk factor for type 1 diabetes development? / Ferrara, Christine Therese; Geyer, Susan Michelle; Liu, Yuk Fun; Evans-Molina, Carmella; Libman, Ingrid M.; Besser, Rachel; Becker, Dorothy J.; Rodriguez, Henry; Moran, Antoinette; Gitelman, Stephen E.; Redondo, Maria J.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 40, No. 5, 01.05.2017, p. 698-701.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ferrara, CT, Geyer, SM, Liu, YF, Evans-Molina, C, Libman, IM, Besser, R, Becker, DJ, Rodriguez, H, Moran, A, Gitelman, SE & Redondo, MJ 2017, 'Excess BMI in childhood: A modifiable risk factor for type 1 diabetes development?', Diabetes Care, vol. 40, no. 5, pp. 698-701. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc16-2331
Ferrara, Christine Therese ; Geyer, Susan Michelle ; Liu, Yuk Fun ; Evans-Molina, Carmella ; Libman, Ingrid M. ; Besser, Rachel ; Becker, Dorothy J. ; Rodriguez, Henry ; Moran, Antoinette ; Gitelman, Stephen E. ; Redondo, Maria J. / Excess BMI in childhood : A modifiable risk factor for type 1 diabetes development?. In: Diabetes Care. 2017 ; Vol. 40, No. 5. pp. 698-701.
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AU - Besser, Rachel

AU - Becker, Dorothy J.

AU - Rodriguez, Henry

AU - Moran, Antoinette

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