Exercise adoption among older, low-income women at risk for cardiovascular disease

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8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using an expanded Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) model, we hypothesized that self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and exercise self-definition would predict exercise adoption. This secondary analysis examined data from a prospective single-group study of low-income women who received a physician screen and referral to a community-based, free exercise program. The sample included 190 older, low-income women with a mean age of 64 years, the majority of whom were African American (66%) and had at least one cardiovascular risk factor (92%). Baseline values of self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and exercise self-definition were measured using instruments developed for the study. Exercise adoption was defined as the number of exercise sessions completed over 8 weeks. Our hypothesis was tested using hierarchical multiple regression. The mean number of exercise sessions completed over the 8-week period was 5.7 out of a recommended 24. Value of Exercise scores, a subscale of the Exercise Self-Definition scale, predicted exercise adoption. Self-efficacy and outcome expectations were not predictive. The significance of Value of Exercise scores reinforces the importance of expanding SCT with additional variables such as exercise self-definition. Future work should emphasize the social and environmental factors that form an important part of SCT.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)79-88
Number of pages10
JournalPublic health nursing (Boston, Mass.)
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2010

Fingerprint

Cardiovascular Diseases
Exercise
Self Efficacy
African Americans
Referral and Consultation
Physicians

Keywords

  • Exercise adoption
  • Exercise self-definition
  • Social Cognitive Theory
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Nursing(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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