Exercise self-efficacy and its correlates among socioeconomically disadvantaged older adults

Daniel Clark, Faryle Nothwehr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Self-efficacy has been shown to be one of the strongest, mutable predictors of exercise behavior. This report presents data on exercise self-efficacy and outcome expectations and their correlates within a stratified random sample of 729 urban, lower-income primary-care patients age 55 and older. Exercise self-efficacy scores were greater among persons with current exercise, no pain or fear of shortness of breath with exercise, and good self-rated health. Higher outcome expectations scores were associated with verbal persuasion from a doctor or from family and friends and positive attitudes and knowledge of exercise. Sociodemographic characteristics, environmental factors, and intrapersonal factors accounted for 31% of the variance in self-efficacy, but just 13% of the variance in outcome expectations. Further work on potential correlates and their measurement is needed to identify determinants of both outcome expectations and self-efficacy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)535-546
Number of pages12
JournalHealth Education and Behavior
Volume26
Issue number4
StatePublished - Aug 1999

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Vulnerable Populations
Self Efficacy
Exercise
Persuasive Communication
Dyspnea
Fear
Self-efficacy
Primary Health Care
Pain
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Exercise self-efficacy and its correlates among socioeconomically disadvantaged older adults. / Clark, Daniel; Nothwehr, Faryle.

In: Health Education and Behavior, Vol. 26, No. 4, 08.1999, p. 535-546.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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