Exercise training and dietary glycemic load may have synergistic effects on insulin resistance in older obese adults

John P. Kirwan, Hope Barkoukis, Latina M. Brooks, Christine M. Marchetti, Bradley P. Stetzer, Frank Gonzalez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background/Aims: The aim of this study was to assess the combined effects of exercise and dietary glycemic load on insulin resistance in older obese adults. Methods: Eleven men and women (62 ± 2 years; 97.6 ± 4.8 kg; body mass index 33.2 ± 2.0) participated in a 12-week supervised exercise program, 5 days/week, for about 1 h/day, at 80-85% of maximum heart rate. Dietary glycemic load was calculated from dietary intake records. Insulin resistance was determined using the euglycemic (5.0 mM) hyperinsulinemic (40 mU/m2/min) clamp. Results: The intervention improved insulin sensitivity (2.37 ± 0.37 to 3.28 ± 0.52 mg/kg/min, p <0.004), increased VO2max (p <0.009), and decreased body weight (p <0.009). Despite similar caloric intakes (1,816 ± 128 vs. 1,610 ± 100 kcal/day), dietary glycemic load trended towards a decrease during the study (140 ± 10 g before, vs. 115 ± 8 g during, p <0.04). The change in insulin sensitivity correlated with the change in glycemic load (r = 0.84, p <0.009). Four subjects reduced their glycemic load by 61 ± 8%, and had significantly greater increases in insulin sensitivity (78 ± 11 vs. 23 ± 8%, p <0.003), and decreases in body weight (p <0.004) and plasma triglycerides (p <0.04) compared to the rest of the group. Conclusion: The data suggest that combining a low-glycemic diet with exercise may provide an alternative and more effective treatment for insulin resistance in older obese adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)326-333
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume55
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Insulin Resistance
Exercise
Body Weight
Diet Records
Energy Intake
Glycemic Load
Triglycerides
Body Mass Index
Heart Rate
Diet
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Diabetes
  • Glycemic index
  • Insulin sensitivity
  • Obesity
  • Physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Kirwan, J. P., Barkoukis, H., Brooks, L. M., Marchetti, C. M., Stetzer, B. P., & Gonzalez, F. (2009). Exercise training and dietary glycemic load may have synergistic effects on insulin resistance in older obese adults. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, 55(4), 326-333. https://doi.org/10.1159/000248991

Exercise training and dietary glycemic load may have synergistic effects on insulin resistance in older obese adults. / Kirwan, John P.; Barkoukis, Hope; Brooks, Latina M.; Marchetti, Christine M.; Stetzer, Bradley P.; Gonzalez, Frank.

In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, Vol. 55, No. 4, 12.2009, p. 326-333.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kirwan, John P. ; Barkoukis, Hope ; Brooks, Latina M. ; Marchetti, Christine M. ; Stetzer, Bradley P. ; Gonzalez, Frank. / Exercise training and dietary glycemic load may have synergistic effects on insulin resistance in older obese adults. In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism. 2009 ; Vol. 55, No. 4. pp. 326-333.
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