Exercise training depletes sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium in coronary smooth muscle

L. Stehno-Bittel, M. H. Laughlin, Michael Sturek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined the effects of chronic exercise training on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca uptake, spontaneous SR Ca release, and whole-cell currents in coronary smooth muscle cells. Single coronary artery smooth muscle cells demonstrated increases in intracellular free Ca (Ca(i)) during depolarization (measured with fura-2) that were abolished by diltiazem (10-4 M). Diltiazem significantly inhibited (80%) refilling of the SR Ca store. The SR Ca store of exercise-trained pigs was 64% less after 11 min vs. 2 min of recovery, whereas cells from sedentary pigs showed no depletion. Exercise-training- induced depletion of the SR Ca store was abolished when ryanodine (10-5 M) was applied during the recovery, but depletion was enhanced by low concentrations of ryanodine (10-8 M). In smooth muscle from sedentary pigs, 10-8 M ryanodine mimicked the effects of exercise training by depleting the SR Ca store during 11 min of recovery (54% depletion). When allowed a longer recovery without ryanodine (14 min or without prior depolarization), the SR Ca store in cells from exercise-trained pigs returned toward peak levels. The outward K current vs. voltage relationship did not differ in cells from exercise-trained or sedentary pigs. Exercise training reduced the number of spontaneous transient outward currents normally found in cells from sedentary pigs. We introduce a model that provides a rational basis to explain the results obtained in this study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1764-1773
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume71
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sarcoplasmic Reticulum
Smooth Muscle
Ryanodine
Exercise
Swine
Calcium
Diltiazem
Smooth Muscle Myocytes
Coronary Vessels

Keywords

  • caffeine
  • calcium release channel
  • diltiazem
  • porcine
  • potassium channel
  • ryanodine
  • spontaneous transient outward currents
  • voltage-gated calcium channel

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Endocrinology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Exercise training depletes sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium in coronary smooth muscle. / Stehno-Bittel, L.; Laughlin, M. H.; Sturek, Michael.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 71, No. 5, 1991, p. 1764-1773.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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