Expected hospital costs of knee replacement for rural residents by location of service

Steven D. Culler, Ann Holmes, Benjamin Gutierrez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article assesses the relative cost of providing a specific procedure, knee replacement (KR) surgery, to rural residents in rural community-based hospitals rather than in urban hospitals. Costs are predicted using regression analysis with readily available data from Health Care Financing Administration’s Medicare Provider Analysis and Review. The specification incorporates the effect of referral patterns on volume and the subsequent impact on costs in the different settings. The predicted cost per case was found to be lower in rural rather than urban hospitals across all patient types. Findings indicate scale economies exist for KR surgery in both the urban and rural hospital settings. Results also suggest the total cost of a hospitalization associated with KR surgery in rural hospitals is more sensitive to changes in procedure volume than in urban hospitals, providing preliminary support for increased regionalization of KR surgery in rural hospitals. While long term outcome measures associated with successful KR surgery (improved function, reduced pain, etc.,) are not available, mortality rates and perisurgical complication rates were not significantly different between rural patients who received KR surgery in rural hospitals and those who received KR surgery in urban hospitals. Among rural hospitals, however, complication rates were significantly correlated with procedure volume (complication rates were significantly lower in rural hospitals that performed more than nine KR surgeries a year). Our results suggest KR surgery can be delivered efficiently in rural community-based settings and support the case for regionalization of this procedure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1188-1209
Number of pages22
JournalMedical Care
Volume33
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

Fingerprint

Hospital Costs
Rural Hospitals
Knee
Urban Hospitals
Costs and Cost Analysis
Rural Population
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (U.S.)
Community Hospital
Medicare
Hospitalization
Referral and Consultation
Regression Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pain
Mortality

Keywords

  • Economics of scale
  • Hospital cost
  • Regionalization
  • Rural hospital

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Expected hospital costs of knee replacement for rural residents by location of service. / Culler, Steven D.; Holmes, Ann; Gutierrez, Benjamin.

In: Medical Care, Vol. 33, No. 12, 01.01.1995, p. 1188-1209.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Culler, Steven D. ; Holmes, Ann ; Gutierrez, Benjamin. / Expected hospital costs of knee replacement for rural residents by location of service. In: Medical Care. 1995 ; Vol. 33, No. 12. pp. 1188-1209.
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