Experimental support for a model of birdsong production

G. B. Mindlin, T. J. Gardner, F. Goller, Roderick Suthers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this work we present an experimental validation of a recently proposed model for the production of birdsongs. We have previously observed that driving the model with simple functions of time, which represent tensions in vocal muscles, produces a wide variety of sounds resembling birdsongs. In this work we drive the model with functions whose time dependence comes from recordings of muscle activities and air sac pressure. We simultaneously recorded the birds' songs and compared them with the synthetic songs. The model produces recognizable songs. Beyond finding a qualitative agreement, we also test some predictions of the model concerning the relative levels of activity in the gating muscles at the beginning and end of a syllable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41908
Number of pages1
JournalPhysical review. E, Statistical, nonlinear, and soft matter physics
Volume68
Issue number4
StatePublished - Oct 1 2003

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muscles
Muscle
syllables
birds
Model
Experimental Validation
Time Dependence
time dependence
recording
acoustics
Prediction
air
predictions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Statistical and Nonlinear Physics
  • Statistics and Probability
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Experimental support for a model of birdsong production. / Mindlin, G. B.; Gardner, T. J.; Goller, F.; Suthers, Roderick.

In: Physical review. E, Statistical, nonlinear, and soft matter physics, Vol. 68, No. 4, 01.10.2003, p. 41908.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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