Exploration of environmental and genetic risk factors for Alzheimer's disease

The value of cross-cultural studies

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Advances in molecular genetics have revolutionized epidemiological research. It is now possible to combine the techniques of population genetics with research on risk factors to construct genetic-environmental interactive models that explain geographic-ethnic variations in disease rates. Cross-cultural studies involving populations from developing and developed countries offer a unique opportunity for constructing these models by providing a wide diversity of environmental exposures. Results from a comparative Indianapolis-Ibadan study suggest that Alzheimer's disease incidence rates are lower in Yoruba than in African Americans and that these lower rates may be due to a combination of genetic and environmental, primarily dietary, influences.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)98-101
Number of pages4
JournalCurrent Directions in Psychological Science
Volume10
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 2001

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Genetic Research
Environmental Exposure
Population Genetics
Developed Countries
African Americans
Developing Countries
Molecular Biology
Alzheimer Disease
Incidence
Research
Population

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Cross-cultural
  • Genetics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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