Extending HIV care in resource-limited settings

Kara Wools-Kaloustian, Sylvester Kimaiyo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the clear benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), only three countries in sub-Saharan Africa have achieved the "3 by 5" goal of treating at least half of the persons living with HIV/AIDS who need it. A major obstacle faced by many lower income countries is the establishment of treatment programs in rural areas where there is a scarcity of trained health care providers and infrastructure. This paper reviews published data on rural ART programs in lower income countries to identify necessary components of such a program. No clearly superior model for rural ART delivery has emerged. All programs document the need for expanded physical infrastructure, laboratory development, recruitment/training of additional health care providers, and/or the introduction of new technologies in order to effectively support the needs of ART roll-out.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)182-186
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent HIV/AIDS Reports
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2006

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HIV
Health Personnel
Therapeutics
Africa South of the Sahara
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Extending HIV care in resource-limited settings. / Wools-Kaloustian, Kara; Kimaiyo, Sylvester.

In: Current HIV/AIDS Reports, Vol. 3, No. 4, 11.2006, p. 182-186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wools-Kaloustian, Kara ; Kimaiyo, Sylvester. / Extending HIV care in resource-limited settings. In: Current HIV/AIDS Reports. 2006 ; Vol. 3, No. 4. pp. 182-186.
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