Factors that influence the recruitment and retention of nurses in public health agencies

Valerie Yeager, Janna M. Wisniewski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Given challenges to recruiting nurses to public health and the growth in national policies focused on population health, it is crucial that public health agencies develop strategies to sustain this important group of employees. The objective of this study was to examine factors that influence nurses’ decisions to work in public health agencies. Methods: This cross-sectional study examined perspectives of nurses who worked in state and local public health departments and responded to the 2010 Council on Linkages Between Academia and Public Health Practice’s survey of public health workers. We calculated the mean rating of each recruitment and retention factor for nurses and non-nurses separately and compared differences by using t tests. We then used multivariate regression analysis to examine differences in ratings by role (ie, nurse or non-nurse). Results: After controlling for personal and organizational characteristics, the influence of 5 recruitment factors was significantly stronger among nurses than among non-nurses: flexibility of work schedule (P < .001), autonomy/employee empowerment (P < .001), ability to innovate (P = .002), specific duties and responsibilities (P = .005), and identifying with the mission of the organization (P = .02). The influence of 5 retention factors was stronger among nurses than among non-nurses: autonomy/employee empowerment (P < .001), flexibility of work schedule (P < .001), specific duties and responsibilities (P < .001), opportunities for training/continuing education (P = .03), and ability to innovate (P = .008). Conclusions: Some factors that influence nurses to begin and remain working in local governmental public health agencies, such as flexible schedules and employee autonomy, are factors that governmental public health agencies can design into positions and highlight when recruiting from health care organizations, private industry, and academia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)556-562
Number of pages7
JournalPublic Health Reports
Volume132
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Public Health Nurses
Public Health
Nurses
Appointments and Schedules
Aptitude
Public Health Practice
Nurse's Role
Continuing Education
Health Surveys
Industry
Multivariate Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Regression Analysis
Organizations
Delivery of Health Care
Health
Growth
Population

Keywords

  • Nurses
  • Public health workforce
  • Recruitment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Factors that influence the recruitment and retention of nurses in public health agencies. / Yeager, Valerie; Wisniewski, Janna M.

In: Public Health Reports, Vol. 132, No. 5, 01.01.2017, p. 556-562.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{115e411fb91d422c8680a194aa965c8d,
title = "Factors that influence the recruitment and retention of nurses in public health agencies",
abstract = "Objective: Given challenges to recruiting nurses to public health and the growth in national policies focused on population health, it is crucial that public health agencies develop strategies to sustain this important group of employees. The objective of this study was to examine factors that influence nurses’ decisions to work in public health agencies. Methods: This cross-sectional study examined perspectives of nurses who worked in state and local public health departments and responded to the 2010 Council on Linkages Between Academia and Public Health Practice’s survey of public health workers. We calculated the mean rating of each recruitment and retention factor for nurses and non-nurses separately and compared differences by using t tests. We then used multivariate regression analysis to examine differences in ratings by role (ie, nurse or non-nurse). Results: After controlling for personal and organizational characteristics, the influence of 5 recruitment factors was significantly stronger among nurses than among non-nurses: flexibility of work schedule (P < .001), autonomy/employee empowerment (P < .001), ability to innovate (P = .002), specific duties and responsibilities (P = .005), and identifying with the mission of the organization (P = .02). The influence of 5 retention factors was stronger among nurses than among non-nurses: autonomy/employee empowerment (P < .001), flexibility of work schedule (P < .001), specific duties and responsibilities (P < .001), opportunities for training/continuing education (P = .03), and ability to innovate (P = .008). Conclusions: Some factors that influence nurses to begin and remain working in local governmental public health agencies, such as flexible schedules and employee autonomy, are factors that governmental public health agencies can design into positions and highlight when recruiting from health care organizations, private industry, and academia.",
keywords = "Nurses, Public health workforce, Recruitment",
author = "Valerie Yeager and Wisniewski, {Janna M.}",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0033354917719704",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "132",
pages = "556--562",
journal = "Public Health Reports",
issn = "0033-3549",
publisher = "Association of Schools of Public Health",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Factors that influence the recruitment and retention of nurses in public health agencies

AU - Yeager, Valerie

AU - Wisniewski, Janna M.

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - Objective: Given challenges to recruiting nurses to public health and the growth in national policies focused on population health, it is crucial that public health agencies develop strategies to sustain this important group of employees. The objective of this study was to examine factors that influence nurses’ decisions to work in public health agencies. Methods: This cross-sectional study examined perspectives of nurses who worked in state and local public health departments and responded to the 2010 Council on Linkages Between Academia and Public Health Practice’s survey of public health workers. We calculated the mean rating of each recruitment and retention factor for nurses and non-nurses separately and compared differences by using t tests. We then used multivariate regression analysis to examine differences in ratings by role (ie, nurse or non-nurse). Results: After controlling for personal and organizational characteristics, the influence of 5 recruitment factors was significantly stronger among nurses than among non-nurses: flexibility of work schedule (P < .001), autonomy/employee empowerment (P < .001), ability to innovate (P = .002), specific duties and responsibilities (P = .005), and identifying with the mission of the organization (P = .02). The influence of 5 retention factors was stronger among nurses than among non-nurses: autonomy/employee empowerment (P < .001), flexibility of work schedule (P < .001), specific duties and responsibilities (P < .001), opportunities for training/continuing education (P = .03), and ability to innovate (P = .008). Conclusions: Some factors that influence nurses to begin and remain working in local governmental public health agencies, such as flexible schedules and employee autonomy, are factors that governmental public health agencies can design into positions and highlight when recruiting from health care organizations, private industry, and academia.

AB - Objective: Given challenges to recruiting nurses to public health and the growth in national policies focused on population health, it is crucial that public health agencies develop strategies to sustain this important group of employees. The objective of this study was to examine factors that influence nurses’ decisions to work in public health agencies. Methods: This cross-sectional study examined perspectives of nurses who worked in state and local public health departments and responded to the 2010 Council on Linkages Between Academia and Public Health Practice’s survey of public health workers. We calculated the mean rating of each recruitment and retention factor for nurses and non-nurses separately and compared differences by using t tests. We then used multivariate regression analysis to examine differences in ratings by role (ie, nurse or non-nurse). Results: After controlling for personal and organizational characteristics, the influence of 5 recruitment factors was significantly stronger among nurses than among non-nurses: flexibility of work schedule (P < .001), autonomy/employee empowerment (P < .001), ability to innovate (P = .002), specific duties and responsibilities (P = .005), and identifying with the mission of the organization (P = .02). The influence of 5 retention factors was stronger among nurses than among non-nurses: autonomy/employee empowerment (P < .001), flexibility of work schedule (P < .001), specific duties and responsibilities (P < .001), opportunities for training/continuing education (P = .03), and ability to innovate (P = .008). Conclusions: Some factors that influence nurses to begin and remain working in local governmental public health agencies, such as flexible schedules and employee autonomy, are factors that governmental public health agencies can design into positions and highlight when recruiting from health care organizations, private industry, and academia.

KW - Nurses

KW - Public health workforce

KW - Recruitment

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85030427815&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85030427815&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0033354917719704

DO - 10.1177/0033354917719704

M3 - Article

C2 - 28792856

AN - SCOPUS:85030427815

VL - 132

SP - 556

EP - 562

JO - Public Health Reports

JF - Public Health Reports

SN - 0033-3549

IS - 5

ER -