Female pelvic floor symptoms before and after bariatric surgery

Colleen D. McDermott, Colin L. Terry, Samer G. Mattar, Douglass S. Hale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Obesity is a risk factor for female pelvic floor disorders. The study objective was to determine whether there was a difference in the subjective reporting of pelvic symptoms before and after bariatric surgery. Methods This was a prospective cohort study of female patients that underwent bariatric surgery. Patients completed a demographic questionnaire, the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory-20 (PFDI-20), and the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire-7 (PFIQ-7) before surgery and at 6 and 12 months following surgery. Body mass index (BMI) was compared between time points using Student's t tests (P<0.05 significant). Symptom and impact on quality of life prevalence were compared usingMcNemar's test and questionnaire scores were compared using the Wilcoxon matched pairs test (P<0.025 significant). Results At 12 months after surgery, 63 patients had completed the study. Even with significant weight loss (BMI, 43.7 kg/m 2 to BMI, 29 kg/m 2; P<0.001), there was no significant difference in the prevalence of pelvic floor symptoms before and after surgery (94% to 81%, P=0.2). Prevalence of pelvic floor symptom impact on quality of life did significantly decrease after surgery (56% to 30%; P=0.004). Baseline PFDI-20 and PFIQ-7 scores were low; however, there was still a significant reduction in PFDI-20 and PFIQ-7 scores after surgery (P<0.001). Conclusions Prevalence of pelvic floor symptoms did not vary greatly after surgery; however, significant weight reduction did improve the degree of bother and quality of life related to these symptoms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1244-1250
Number of pages7
JournalObesity Surgery
Volume22
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2012

Fingerprint

Pelvic Floor
Bariatric Surgery
Body Mass Index
Quality of Life
Equipment and Supplies
Weight Loss
Pelvic Floor Disorders
Cohort Studies
Obesity
Demography
Surveys and Questionnaires
Prospective Studies
Students

Keywords

  • Bariatric
  • Female
  • Pelvic floor
  • Symptoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

McDermott, C. D., Terry, C. L., Mattar, S. G., & Hale, D. S. (2012). Female pelvic floor symptoms before and after bariatric surgery. Obesity Surgery, 22(8), 1244-1250. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11695-012-0592-5

Female pelvic floor symptoms before and after bariatric surgery. / McDermott, Colleen D.; Terry, Colin L.; Mattar, Samer G.; Hale, Douglass S.

In: Obesity Surgery, Vol. 22, No. 8, 08.2012, p. 1244-1250.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McDermott, CD, Terry, CL, Mattar, SG & Hale, DS 2012, 'Female pelvic floor symptoms before and after bariatric surgery', Obesity Surgery, vol. 22, no. 8, pp. 1244-1250. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11695-012-0592-5
McDermott, Colleen D. ; Terry, Colin L. ; Mattar, Samer G. ; Hale, Douglass S. / Female pelvic floor symptoms before and after bariatric surgery. In: Obesity Surgery. 2012 ; Vol. 22, No. 8. pp. 1244-1250.
@article{4ed69fe402c34e5b8d688656be43553e,
title = "Female pelvic floor symptoms before and after bariatric surgery",
abstract = "Background Obesity is a risk factor for female pelvic floor disorders. The study objective was to determine whether there was a difference in the subjective reporting of pelvic symptoms before and after bariatric surgery. Methods This was a prospective cohort study of female patients that underwent bariatric surgery. Patients completed a demographic questionnaire, the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory-20 (PFDI-20), and the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire-7 (PFIQ-7) before surgery and at 6 and 12 months following surgery. Body mass index (BMI) was compared between time points using Student's t tests (P<0.05 significant). Symptom and impact on quality of life prevalence were compared usingMcNemar's test and questionnaire scores were compared using the Wilcoxon matched pairs test (P<0.025 significant). Results At 12 months after surgery, 63 patients had completed the study. Even with significant weight loss (BMI, 43.7 kg/m 2 to BMI, 29 kg/m 2; P<0.001), there was no significant difference in the prevalence of pelvic floor symptoms before and after surgery (94{\%} to 81{\%}, P=0.2). Prevalence of pelvic floor symptom impact on quality of life did significantly decrease after surgery (56{\%} to 30{\%}; P=0.004). Baseline PFDI-20 and PFIQ-7 scores were low; however, there was still a significant reduction in PFDI-20 and PFIQ-7 scores after surgery (P<0.001). Conclusions Prevalence of pelvic floor symptoms did not vary greatly after surgery; however, significant weight reduction did improve the degree of bother and quality of life related to these symptoms.",
keywords = "Bariatric, Female, Pelvic floor, Symptoms",
author = "McDermott, {Colleen D.} and Terry, {Colin L.} and Mattar, {Samer G.} and Hale, {Douglass S.}",
year = "2012",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1007/s11695-012-0592-5",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "1244--1250",
journal = "Obesity Surgery",
issn = "0960-8923",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Female pelvic floor symptoms before and after bariatric surgery

AU - McDermott, Colleen D.

AU - Terry, Colin L.

AU - Mattar, Samer G.

AU - Hale, Douglass S.

PY - 2012/8

Y1 - 2012/8

N2 - Background Obesity is a risk factor for female pelvic floor disorders. The study objective was to determine whether there was a difference in the subjective reporting of pelvic symptoms before and after bariatric surgery. Methods This was a prospective cohort study of female patients that underwent bariatric surgery. Patients completed a demographic questionnaire, the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory-20 (PFDI-20), and the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire-7 (PFIQ-7) before surgery and at 6 and 12 months following surgery. Body mass index (BMI) was compared between time points using Student's t tests (P<0.05 significant). Symptom and impact on quality of life prevalence were compared usingMcNemar's test and questionnaire scores were compared using the Wilcoxon matched pairs test (P<0.025 significant). Results At 12 months after surgery, 63 patients had completed the study. Even with significant weight loss (BMI, 43.7 kg/m 2 to BMI, 29 kg/m 2; P<0.001), there was no significant difference in the prevalence of pelvic floor symptoms before and after surgery (94% to 81%, P=0.2). Prevalence of pelvic floor symptom impact on quality of life did significantly decrease after surgery (56% to 30%; P=0.004). Baseline PFDI-20 and PFIQ-7 scores were low; however, there was still a significant reduction in PFDI-20 and PFIQ-7 scores after surgery (P<0.001). Conclusions Prevalence of pelvic floor symptoms did not vary greatly after surgery; however, significant weight reduction did improve the degree of bother and quality of life related to these symptoms.

AB - Background Obesity is a risk factor for female pelvic floor disorders. The study objective was to determine whether there was a difference in the subjective reporting of pelvic symptoms before and after bariatric surgery. Methods This was a prospective cohort study of female patients that underwent bariatric surgery. Patients completed a demographic questionnaire, the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory-20 (PFDI-20), and the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire-7 (PFIQ-7) before surgery and at 6 and 12 months following surgery. Body mass index (BMI) was compared between time points using Student's t tests (P<0.05 significant). Symptom and impact on quality of life prevalence were compared usingMcNemar's test and questionnaire scores were compared using the Wilcoxon matched pairs test (P<0.025 significant). Results At 12 months after surgery, 63 patients had completed the study. Even with significant weight loss (BMI, 43.7 kg/m 2 to BMI, 29 kg/m 2; P<0.001), there was no significant difference in the prevalence of pelvic floor symptoms before and after surgery (94% to 81%, P=0.2). Prevalence of pelvic floor symptom impact on quality of life did significantly decrease after surgery (56% to 30%; P=0.004). Baseline PFDI-20 and PFIQ-7 scores were low; however, there was still a significant reduction in PFDI-20 and PFIQ-7 scores after surgery (P<0.001). Conclusions Prevalence of pelvic floor symptoms did not vary greatly after surgery; however, significant weight reduction did improve the degree of bother and quality of life related to these symptoms.

KW - Bariatric

KW - Female

KW - Pelvic floor

KW - Symptoms

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84864886450&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84864886450&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11695-012-0592-5

DO - 10.1007/s11695-012-0592-5

M3 - Article

C2 - 22258196

AN - SCOPUS:84864886450

VL - 22

SP - 1244

EP - 1250

JO - Obesity Surgery

JF - Obesity Surgery

SN - 0960-8923

IS - 8

ER -