Female sex and gender in lung/sleep health and disease: Increased understanding of basic biological, pathophysiological, and behavioral mechanisms leading to better health for female patients with lung disease

Mei Lan K. Han, Emilio Arteaga-Solis, John Blenis, Ghada Bourjeily, Deborah J. Clegg, Dawn DeMeo, Jeanne Duffy, Ben Gaston, Nicola M. Heller, Anna Hemnes, Elizabeth Petri Henske, Raksha Jain, Tim Lahm, Lisa H. Lancaster, Joyce Lee, Marianne J. Legato, Sherry McKee, Reena Mehra, Alison Morris, Y. S. PrakashMartin R. Stampfli, Rashmi Gopal-Srivastava, Aaron D. Laposky, Antonello Punturieri, Lora Reineck, Xenia Tigno, Janine Clayton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Female sex/gender is an undercharacterized variable in studies related to lung development and disease. Notwithstanding, many aspects of lung and sleep biology and pathobiology are impacted by female sex and female reproductive transitions. These may manifest as differential gene expression or peculiar organ development. Some conditions are more prevalent in women, such as asthma and insomnia, or, in the case of lymphangioleiomyomatosis, are seen almost exclusively in women. In other diseases, presentation differs, such as the higher frequency of exacerbations experienced by women with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or greater cardiac morbidity among women with sleep-disordered breathing. Recent advances in -omics and behavioral science provide an opportunity to specifically address sex-based differences and explore research needs and opportunities that will elucidate biochemical pathways, thus enabling more targeted/personalized therapies. To explore the status of and opportunities for research in this area, the NHLBI, in partnership with the NIH Office of Research on Women's Health and the Office of Rare Diseases Research, convened a workshop of investigators in Bethesda, Maryland on September 18 and 19, 2017. At the workshop, the participants reviewed the current understanding of the biological, behavioral, and clinical implications of female sex and gender on lung and sleep health and disease, and formulated recommendations that address research gaps, with a view to achieving better health outcomes through more precise management of female patients with nonneoplastic lung disease. This report summarizes those discussions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)850-858
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Volume198
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

Fingerprint

Lung Diseases
Sleep
Lung
Health
Research
Lymphangioleiomyomatosis
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (U.S.)
Behavioral Sciences
Education
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Women's Health
Rare Diseases
Sex Characteristics
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Asthma
Research Personnel
Morbidity
Gene Expression
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Lung disorders
  • Sex/gender
  • Sleep disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Female sex and gender in lung/sleep health and disease : Increased understanding of basic biological, pathophysiological, and behavioral mechanisms leading to better health for female patients with lung disease. / Han, Mei Lan K.; Arteaga-Solis, Emilio; Blenis, John; Bourjeily, Ghada; Clegg, Deborah J.; DeMeo, Dawn; Duffy, Jeanne; Gaston, Ben; Heller, Nicola M.; Hemnes, Anna; Henske, Elizabeth Petri; Jain, Raksha; Lahm, Tim; Lancaster, Lisa H.; Lee, Joyce; Legato, Marianne J.; McKee, Sherry; Mehra, Reena; Morris, Alison; Prakash, Y. S.; Stampfli, Martin R.; Gopal-Srivastava, Rashmi; Laposky, Aaron D.; Punturieri, Antonello; Reineck, Lora; Tigno, Xenia; Clayton, Janine.

In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 198, No. 7, 01.10.2018, p. 850-858.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Han, MLK, Arteaga-Solis, E, Blenis, J, Bourjeily, G, Clegg, DJ, DeMeo, D, Duffy, J, Gaston, B, Heller, NM, Hemnes, A, Henske, EP, Jain, R, Lahm, T, Lancaster, LH, Lee, J, Legato, MJ, McKee, S, Mehra, R, Morris, A, Prakash, YS, Stampfli, MR, Gopal-Srivastava, R, Laposky, AD, Punturieri, A, Reineck, L, Tigno, X & Clayton, J 2018, 'Female sex and gender in lung/sleep health and disease: Increased understanding of basic biological, pathophysiological, and behavioral mechanisms leading to better health for female patients with lung disease', American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol. 198, no. 7, pp. 850-858. https://doi.org/10.1164/rccm.201801-0168WS
Han, Mei Lan K. ; Arteaga-Solis, Emilio ; Blenis, John ; Bourjeily, Ghada ; Clegg, Deborah J. ; DeMeo, Dawn ; Duffy, Jeanne ; Gaston, Ben ; Heller, Nicola M. ; Hemnes, Anna ; Henske, Elizabeth Petri ; Jain, Raksha ; Lahm, Tim ; Lancaster, Lisa H. ; Lee, Joyce ; Legato, Marianne J. ; McKee, Sherry ; Mehra, Reena ; Morris, Alison ; Prakash, Y. S. ; Stampfli, Martin R. ; Gopal-Srivastava, Rashmi ; Laposky, Aaron D. ; Punturieri, Antonello ; Reineck, Lora ; Tigno, Xenia ; Clayton, Janine. / Female sex and gender in lung/sleep health and disease : Increased understanding of basic biological, pathophysiological, and behavioral mechanisms leading to better health for female patients with lung disease. In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 198, No. 7. pp. 850-858.
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