"Figuring out whether they can be trusted": Older widows' intentions relative to hired non-professional home-care helpers

Eileen J. Porter, Sue Lasiter, Emily Poston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this phenomenological study was to describe the experience of older women relative to trusting hired non-professional home-care helpers. Open-ended interviews were done about the home-care experience with 25 women over three years, and 14 women (age 80-93) shared data about hiring and trusting helpers. The women perceived risks to personal safety that adversely influenced willingness to seek new helpers. After hiring a helper, the women were still trying to discern whether the helper could be trusted. Primary-care providers should enable older women to recognize and reduce the risk of having helpers and to monitor helpers' behavior, as well as assessing the psychosocial status of women who have such helpers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-92
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Women and Aging
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005

Keywords

  • Home care
  • Older women
  • Trust

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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