Fixation control and eye alignment in children treated for dense congenital or developmental cataracts

Eileen E. Birch, Jingyun Wang, Joost Felius, David R. Stager, Richard W. Hertle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Many children treated for cataracts develop strabismus and nystagmus; however, little is known about the critical period for adverse ocular motor outcomes with respect to age of onset and duration. Methods: Children who had undergone extraction of dense cataracts by the age of 5 years were enrolled postoperatively. Ocular alignment was assessed regularly throughout follow-up. Fixation stability and associated ocular oscillations were determined from eye movement recordings at ≥5 years old. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate whether laterality (unilateral vs bilateral), age at onset, and/or duration of visual deprivation were associated with adverse ocular motor outcomes and to determine multivariate odds ratios (ORs). Results: A total of 41 children were included. Of these, 27 (66%) developed strabismus; 29 (71%) developed nystagmus. Congenital onset was associated with significant risk for strabismus (OR, 5.3; 95% CI, 1.1-34.1); infantile onset was associated with significant risk for nystagmus (OR, 13.6; 95% CI, 1.6-302). Duration >6 weeks was associated with significant risk for both strabismus (OR, 9.1; 95% CI, 1.9-54.2) and nystagmus (OR, 46.2; 95% CI, 6.0-1005). Congenital onset was associated with significant risk for interocular asymmetry in severity of nystagmus (OR, 25.0; 95% CI, 2.6-649), as was unilateral cataract (OR, 58.9; 95% CI, 5.1-2318). Conclusions: Laterality (unilateral vs bilateral) and age at onset were significant nonmodifiable risk factors for adverse ocular motor outcomes. Duration of deprivation was a significant modifiable risk factor for adverse ocular motor outcomes. The current study demonstrated that reduced risk for nystagmus and strabismus was associated with deprivation ≤6 weeks.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)156-160
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of AAPOS
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2012

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Cataract
Strabismus
Odds Ratio
Age of Onset
Cataract Extraction
Eye Movements
Logistic Models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Fixation control and eye alignment in children treated for dense congenital or developmental cataracts. / Birch, Eileen E.; Wang, Jingyun; Felius, Joost; Stager, David R.; Hertle, Richard W.

In: Journal of AAPOS, Vol. 16, No. 2, 04.2012, p. 156-160.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Birch, Eileen E. ; Wang, Jingyun ; Felius, Joost ; Stager, David R. ; Hertle, Richard W. / Fixation control and eye alignment in children treated for dense congenital or developmental cataracts. In: Journal of AAPOS. 2012 ; Vol. 16, No. 2. pp. 156-160.
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abstract = "Background: Many children treated for cataracts develop strabismus and nystagmus; however, little is known about the critical period for adverse ocular motor outcomes with respect to age of onset and duration. Methods: Children who had undergone extraction of dense cataracts by the age of 5 years were enrolled postoperatively. Ocular alignment was assessed regularly throughout follow-up. Fixation stability and associated ocular oscillations were determined from eye movement recordings at ≥5 years old. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate whether laterality (unilateral vs bilateral), age at onset, and/or duration of visual deprivation were associated with adverse ocular motor outcomes and to determine multivariate odds ratios (ORs). Results: A total of 41 children were included. Of these, 27 (66{\%}) developed strabismus; 29 (71{\%}) developed nystagmus. Congenital onset was associated with significant risk for strabismus (OR, 5.3; 95{\%} CI, 1.1-34.1); infantile onset was associated with significant risk for nystagmus (OR, 13.6; 95{\%} CI, 1.6-302). Duration >6 weeks was associated with significant risk for both strabismus (OR, 9.1; 95{\%} CI, 1.9-54.2) and nystagmus (OR, 46.2; 95{\%} CI, 6.0-1005). Congenital onset was associated with significant risk for interocular asymmetry in severity of nystagmus (OR, 25.0; 95{\%} CI, 2.6-649), as was unilateral cataract (OR, 58.9; 95{\%} CI, 5.1-2318). Conclusions: Laterality (unilateral vs bilateral) and age at onset were significant nonmodifiable risk factors for adverse ocular motor outcomes. Duration of deprivation was a significant modifiable risk factor for adverse ocular motor outcomes. The current study demonstrated that reduced risk for nystagmus and strabismus was associated with deprivation ≤6 weeks.",
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