Fixed-facility workplace screening mammography

Handel E. Reynolds, Gregory N. Larkin, Valerie Jackson, Donald Hawes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. Potential barriers to compliance with screening mammography guidelines include the cost and inconvenience involved with undergoing the procedure. Workplace screening with mobile mammography is one possible approach to the convenience barrier. However, fixed-facility workplace screening is a viable alternative for any company with a large workforce in one location. This paper describes our initial experience with one such fixed facility. MATERIALS AND METHODS. The facility was a cooperative venture by a large pharmaceutical company and an academic radiology department to provide convenient, no-cost (to the patient) screening mammography to employees, dependents, and retirees more than 40 years old. The pharmaceutical company built the facility within its corporate headquarters and the academic radiology department provided the equipment and personnel. The company was billed a fixed cost per examination. RESULTS. In the first 22 months of operation, 4210 (of 4559 scheduled) screening mammograms were obtained. The mean age of the population was 53 years old. Ninety percent of the screening mammograms were interpreted as negative or benign; 10% required additional workup. Of the screened population, 62 biopsies were recommended and 60 were performed. Of these, 42 were benign and 18 malignant. The cancer detection rate was 4.3 per 1000 (0.43%). At the time of diagnosis, six patients were stage 0, 10 patients were stage I, one patient was stage II, and one patient was stage III. Eleven of the 18 patients had minimal cancers. Of the patients who completed a satisfaction survey, 97% percent expressed a high degree of satisfaction with the screening process and stated they would use the facility in the future. CONCLUSION. A fixed facility for workplace screening mammography is a viable way to provide nearly barrier-free access to high-quality mammography. Patient acceptance is high.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)507-510
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
Volume168
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1997

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Mammography
Workplace
Radiology
Costs and Cost Analysis
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Population
Neoplasms
Guidelines
Biopsy
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Fixed-facility workplace screening mammography. / Reynolds, Handel E.; Larkin, Gregory N.; Jackson, Valerie; Hawes, Donald.

In: American Journal of Roentgenology, Vol. 168, No. 2, 1997, p. 507-510.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Reynolds, Handel E. ; Larkin, Gregory N. ; Jackson, Valerie ; Hawes, Donald. / Fixed-facility workplace screening mammography. In: American Journal of Roentgenology. 1997 ; Vol. 168, No. 2. pp. 507-510.
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