FLAIR lesion volume in multiple sclerosis: Relation to processing speed and verbal memory

John J. Randolph, Heather A. Wishart, Andrew Saykin, Brenna McDonald, Kimberly R. Schuschu, John W. MacDonald, Alexander C. Mamourian, Camilo E. Fadul, Kathleen A. Ryan, Lloyd H. Kasper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Information processing speed and episodic memory are two commonly affected cognitive abilities in MS. Insights into the mechanisms of and relationships between these abilities have recently come from structural neuroimaging techniques, but few studies have used fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), a neuroimaging sequence known to be sensitive to cortical and juxtacortical lesions in MS. We hypothesized that a volumetric index of FLAIR total lesion volume (TLV) would be associated with slowed processing speed and verbal memory dysfunction in MS. Twenty MS patients underwent FLAIR imaging and were administered measures of verbal memory and processing speed. Correlational and regression analyses indicated that TLV was directly and independently related to measures of processing speed and verbal memory, and TLV accounted for 56% of the variance in cognitive performance. These findings, considered in the context of prior work, suggest that FLAIR TLV is a useful predictor of commonly impaired cognitive functions in MS, and shows promise as a functionally relevant biomarker for disease status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-209
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Multiple Sclerosis
Aptitude
Neuroimaging
Episodic Memory
Automatic Data Processing
Cognition
Biomarkers
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • FLAIR
  • Lesion volume
  • MS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

FLAIR lesion volume in multiple sclerosis : Relation to processing speed and verbal memory. / Randolph, John J.; Wishart, Heather A.; Saykin, Andrew; McDonald, Brenna; Schuschu, Kimberly R.; MacDonald, John W.; Mamourian, Alexander C.; Fadul, Camilo E.; Ryan, Kathleen A.; Kasper, Lloyd H.

In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, Vol. 11, No. 2, 03.2005, p. 205-209.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Randolph, JJ, Wishart, HA, Saykin, A, McDonald, B, Schuschu, KR, MacDonald, JW, Mamourian, AC, Fadul, CE, Ryan, KA & Kasper, LH 2005, 'FLAIR lesion volume in multiple sclerosis: Relation to processing speed and verbal memory', Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 205-209. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1355617705050253
Randolph, John J. ; Wishart, Heather A. ; Saykin, Andrew ; McDonald, Brenna ; Schuschu, Kimberly R. ; MacDonald, John W. ; Mamourian, Alexander C. ; Fadul, Camilo E. ; Ryan, Kathleen A. ; Kasper, Lloyd H. / FLAIR lesion volume in multiple sclerosis : Relation to processing speed and verbal memory. In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society. 2005 ; Vol. 11, No. 2. pp. 205-209.
@article{b34b43f24bfe4e8e884c34524ed2d693,
title = "FLAIR lesion volume in multiple sclerosis: Relation to processing speed and verbal memory",
abstract = "Information processing speed and episodic memory are two commonly affected cognitive abilities in MS. Insights into the mechanisms of and relationships between these abilities have recently come from structural neuroimaging techniques, but few studies have used fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), a neuroimaging sequence known to be sensitive to cortical and juxtacortical lesions in MS. We hypothesized that a volumetric index of FLAIR total lesion volume (TLV) would be associated with slowed processing speed and verbal memory dysfunction in MS. Twenty MS patients underwent FLAIR imaging and were administered measures of verbal memory and processing speed. Correlational and regression analyses indicated that TLV was directly and independently related to measures of processing speed and verbal memory, and TLV accounted for 56{\%} of the variance in cognitive performance. These findings, considered in the context of prior work, suggest that FLAIR TLV is a useful predictor of commonly impaired cognitive functions in MS, and shows promise as a functionally relevant biomarker for disease status.",
keywords = "Cognition, FLAIR, Lesion volume, MS",
author = "Randolph, {John J.} and Wishart, {Heather A.} and Andrew Saykin and Brenna McDonald and Schuschu, {Kimberly R.} and MacDonald, {John W.} and Mamourian, {Alexander C.} and Fadul, {Camilo E.} and Ryan, {Kathleen A.} and Kasper, {Lloyd H.}",
year = "2005",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1017/S1355617705050253",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "11",
pages = "205--209",
journal = "Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society",
issn = "1355-6177",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - FLAIR lesion volume in multiple sclerosis

T2 - Relation to processing speed and verbal memory

AU - Randolph, John J.

AU - Wishart, Heather A.

AU - Saykin, Andrew

AU - McDonald, Brenna

AU - Schuschu, Kimberly R.

AU - MacDonald, John W.

AU - Mamourian, Alexander C.

AU - Fadul, Camilo E.

AU - Ryan, Kathleen A.

AU - Kasper, Lloyd H.

PY - 2005/3

Y1 - 2005/3

N2 - Information processing speed and episodic memory are two commonly affected cognitive abilities in MS. Insights into the mechanisms of and relationships between these abilities have recently come from structural neuroimaging techniques, but few studies have used fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), a neuroimaging sequence known to be sensitive to cortical and juxtacortical lesions in MS. We hypothesized that a volumetric index of FLAIR total lesion volume (TLV) would be associated with slowed processing speed and verbal memory dysfunction in MS. Twenty MS patients underwent FLAIR imaging and were administered measures of verbal memory and processing speed. Correlational and regression analyses indicated that TLV was directly and independently related to measures of processing speed and verbal memory, and TLV accounted for 56% of the variance in cognitive performance. These findings, considered in the context of prior work, suggest that FLAIR TLV is a useful predictor of commonly impaired cognitive functions in MS, and shows promise as a functionally relevant biomarker for disease status.

AB - Information processing speed and episodic memory are two commonly affected cognitive abilities in MS. Insights into the mechanisms of and relationships between these abilities have recently come from structural neuroimaging techniques, but few studies have used fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), a neuroimaging sequence known to be sensitive to cortical and juxtacortical lesions in MS. We hypothesized that a volumetric index of FLAIR total lesion volume (TLV) would be associated with slowed processing speed and verbal memory dysfunction in MS. Twenty MS patients underwent FLAIR imaging and were administered measures of verbal memory and processing speed. Correlational and regression analyses indicated that TLV was directly and independently related to measures of processing speed and verbal memory, and TLV accounted for 56% of the variance in cognitive performance. These findings, considered in the context of prior work, suggest that FLAIR TLV is a useful predictor of commonly impaired cognitive functions in MS, and shows promise as a functionally relevant biomarker for disease status.

KW - Cognition

KW - FLAIR

KW - Lesion volume

KW - MS

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=20244384858&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=20244384858&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S1355617705050253

DO - 10.1017/S1355617705050253

M3 - Article

C2 - 15962708

AN - SCOPUS:20244384858

VL - 11

SP - 205

EP - 209

JO - Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society

JF - Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society

SN - 1355-6177

IS - 2

ER -