Fluid balance within the canine anterolateral compartment and its relationship to compartment syndromes

A. R. Hargens, W. H. Akeson, S. J. Mubarak, C. A. Owen, K. L. Evans, L. P. Garetto, M. R. Gonsalves, D. A. Schmidt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

111 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fluid homeostasis within muscle compartments is maintained by four pressures: capillary blood pressure, capillary blood oncotic pressure, tissue-fluid pressure, and tissue-fluid oncotic pressure. As determined in the canine anterolateral compartment, capillary blood pressure is 25 ± 3 millimeters of mercury; capillary blood oncotic pressure, 26 ± 3 millimeters of mercury; tissue-fluid pressure, -2 ± 2 millimeters of mercury; and tissue-fluid oncotic pressure, 11 ± 1 millimeters of mercury. The wick technique allows direct measurement of tissue-fluid pressure in skeletal muscle and, with minor modifications, is adapted to collect microsamples of interstitial fluid for determinations of tissue-fluid oncotic pressure. The wick technique detects very slight fluctuations in intracompartmental pressure such as light finger compression, injection of small volumes of fluid, and even pulsation due to adjacent arterial pressure. Adjacent muscle compartments may contain different tissue-fluid pressures due to impermeable osseofascial barriers. The authors' results obtained in canine muscle compartments pressurized by infusion of autologous plasma suggest that risks of muscle damage are significant at intracompartmental pressures greater than thirty millimeters of mercury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)499-505
Number of pages7
JournalUnknown Journal
Volume60
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1978

Fingerprint

Compartment Syndromes
Water-Electrolyte Balance
Canidae
Pressure
Mercury
Blood Pressure
Muscles
Extracellular Fluid
Fingers
Arterial Pressure
Skeletal Muscle
Homeostasis
Light

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Hargens, A. R., Akeson, W. H., Mubarak, S. J., Owen, C. A., Evans, K. L., Garetto, L. P., ... Schmidt, D. A. (1978). Fluid balance within the canine anterolateral compartment and its relationship to compartment syndromes. Unknown Journal, 60(4), 499-505. https://doi.org/10.2106/00004623-197860040-00012

Fluid balance within the canine anterolateral compartment and its relationship to compartment syndromes. / Hargens, A. R.; Akeson, W. H.; Mubarak, S. J.; Owen, C. A.; Evans, K. L.; Garetto, L. P.; Gonsalves, M. R.; Schmidt, D. A.

In: Unknown Journal, Vol. 60, No. 4, 01.01.1978, p. 499-505.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hargens, AR, Akeson, WH, Mubarak, SJ, Owen, CA, Evans, KL, Garetto, LP, Gonsalves, MR & Schmidt, DA 1978, 'Fluid balance within the canine anterolateral compartment and its relationship to compartment syndromes', Unknown Journal, vol. 60, no. 4, pp. 499-505. https://doi.org/10.2106/00004623-197860040-00012
Hargens, A. R. ; Akeson, W. H. ; Mubarak, S. J. ; Owen, C. A. ; Evans, K. L. ; Garetto, L. P. ; Gonsalves, M. R. ; Schmidt, D. A. / Fluid balance within the canine anterolateral compartment and its relationship to compartment syndromes. In: Unknown Journal. 1978 ; Vol. 60, No. 4. pp. 499-505.
@article{dd0097501fe84093a4618f11fd6fc64e,
title = "Fluid balance within the canine anterolateral compartment and its relationship to compartment syndromes",
abstract = "Fluid homeostasis within muscle compartments is maintained by four pressures: capillary blood pressure, capillary blood oncotic pressure, tissue-fluid pressure, and tissue-fluid oncotic pressure. As determined in the canine anterolateral compartment, capillary blood pressure is 25 ± 3 millimeters of mercury; capillary blood oncotic pressure, 26 ± 3 millimeters of mercury; tissue-fluid pressure, -2 ± 2 millimeters of mercury; and tissue-fluid oncotic pressure, 11 ± 1 millimeters of mercury. The wick technique allows direct measurement of tissue-fluid pressure in skeletal muscle and, with minor modifications, is adapted to collect microsamples of interstitial fluid for determinations of tissue-fluid oncotic pressure. The wick technique detects very slight fluctuations in intracompartmental pressure such as light finger compression, injection of small volumes of fluid, and even pulsation due to adjacent arterial pressure. Adjacent muscle compartments may contain different tissue-fluid pressures due to impermeable osseofascial barriers. The authors' results obtained in canine muscle compartments pressurized by infusion of autologous plasma suggest that risks of muscle damage are significant at intracompartmental pressures greater than thirty millimeters of mercury.",
author = "Hargens, {A. R.} and Akeson, {W. H.} and Mubarak, {S. J.} and Owen, {C. A.} and Evans, {K. L.} and Garetto, {L. P.} and Gonsalves, {M. R.} and Schmidt, {D. A.}",
year = "1978",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2106/00004623-197860040-00012",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "60",
pages = "499--505",
journal = "Biological Psychiatry",
issn = "0006-3223",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fluid balance within the canine anterolateral compartment and its relationship to compartment syndromes

AU - Hargens, A. R.

AU - Akeson, W. H.

AU - Mubarak, S. J.

AU - Owen, C. A.

AU - Evans, K. L.

AU - Garetto, L. P.

AU - Gonsalves, M. R.

AU - Schmidt, D. A.

PY - 1978/1/1

Y1 - 1978/1/1

N2 - Fluid homeostasis within muscle compartments is maintained by four pressures: capillary blood pressure, capillary blood oncotic pressure, tissue-fluid pressure, and tissue-fluid oncotic pressure. As determined in the canine anterolateral compartment, capillary blood pressure is 25 ± 3 millimeters of mercury; capillary blood oncotic pressure, 26 ± 3 millimeters of mercury; tissue-fluid pressure, -2 ± 2 millimeters of mercury; and tissue-fluid oncotic pressure, 11 ± 1 millimeters of mercury. The wick technique allows direct measurement of tissue-fluid pressure in skeletal muscle and, with minor modifications, is adapted to collect microsamples of interstitial fluid for determinations of tissue-fluid oncotic pressure. The wick technique detects very slight fluctuations in intracompartmental pressure such as light finger compression, injection of small volumes of fluid, and even pulsation due to adjacent arterial pressure. Adjacent muscle compartments may contain different tissue-fluid pressures due to impermeable osseofascial barriers. The authors' results obtained in canine muscle compartments pressurized by infusion of autologous plasma suggest that risks of muscle damage are significant at intracompartmental pressures greater than thirty millimeters of mercury.

AB - Fluid homeostasis within muscle compartments is maintained by four pressures: capillary blood pressure, capillary blood oncotic pressure, tissue-fluid pressure, and tissue-fluid oncotic pressure. As determined in the canine anterolateral compartment, capillary blood pressure is 25 ± 3 millimeters of mercury; capillary blood oncotic pressure, 26 ± 3 millimeters of mercury; tissue-fluid pressure, -2 ± 2 millimeters of mercury; and tissue-fluid oncotic pressure, 11 ± 1 millimeters of mercury. The wick technique allows direct measurement of tissue-fluid pressure in skeletal muscle and, with minor modifications, is adapted to collect microsamples of interstitial fluid for determinations of tissue-fluid oncotic pressure. The wick technique detects very slight fluctuations in intracompartmental pressure such as light finger compression, injection of small volumes of fluid, and even pulsation due to adjacent arterial pressure. Adjacent muscle compartments may contain different tissue-fluid pressures due to impermeable osseofascial barriers. The authors' results obtained in canine muscle compartments pressurized by infusion of autologous plasma suggest that risks of muscle damage are significant at intracompartmental pressures greater than thirty millimeters of mercury.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0018102270&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0018102270&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2106/00004623-197860040-00012

DO - 10.2106/00004623-197860040-00012

M3 - Article

C2 - 670272

AN - SCOPUS:0018102270

VL - 60

SP - 499

EP - 505

JO - Biological Psychiatry

JF - Biological Psychiatry

SN - 0006-3223

IS - 4

ER -