Food Safety Post-processing: Transportation, Supermarkets, and Restaurants

Richard H. Linton, David Z. McSwane

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    The size and complexity of the food industry's transportation, retail, and food service sectors are immense. Over 16 million Americans are employed in over 1 million retail establishments nationwide, contributing more than $1 trillion to the US economy every year. Similar to growers and food manufacturers, food employees working in food transit, food service, and retail food establishments have a responsibility to use proper food handling practices that reduce foodborne illness risks. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has identified five key risk factors that contribute to foodborne illness. These include obtaining food from unsafe sources, poor personal hygiene, inadequate cooking, improper holding of food, and contaminated food surfaces and equipment. Results of studies that have evaluated risk in transportation, retail, and food service operations correlate well with the CDC risk factors. As a result, effective food safety programs must actively control risk by employing time/temperature control, good personal hygiene, cross-contamination control, and effective cleaning/sanitizing programs. Education and changing behavior of food employees are the most important prerequisites for successful risk reduction.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationFoodborne Infections and Intoxications
    PublisherElsevier Inc.
    Pages479-496
    Number of pages18
    ISBN (Print)9780124160415
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2013

    Fingerprint

    Restaurants
    food service
    Food Safety
    restaurants
    supermarkets
    food safety
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    Food
    risk reduction
    foodborne illness
    Food Services
    hygiene
    human resources
    food industry
    risk factors
    food surfaces
    food retailing
    sanitizing
    food handling
    Foodborne Diseases

    Keywords

    • CDC risk factors
    • Certified food protection manager
    • Conference for food protection
    • FDA food code
    • Food safety management
    • GFSI
    • HACCP

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine(all)
    • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

    Cite this

    Linton, R. H., & McSwane, D. Z. (2013). Food Safety Post-processing: Transportation, Supermarkets, and Restaurants. In Foodborne Infections and Intoxications (pp. 479-496). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-416041-5.00034-2

    Food Safety Post-processing : Transportation, Supermarkets, and Restaurants. / Linton, Richard H.; McSwane, David Z.

    Foodborne Infections and Intoxications. Elsevier Inc., 2013. p. 479-496.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Linton, RH & McSwane, DZ 2013, Food Safety Post-processing: Transportation, Supermarkets, and Restaurants. in Foodborne Infections and Intoxications. Elsevier Inc., pp. 479-496. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-416041-5.00034-2
    Linton RH, McSwane DZ. Food Safety Post-processing: Transportation, Supermarkets, and Restaurants. In Foodborne Infections and Intoxications. Elsevier Inc. 2013. p. 479-496 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-416041-5.00034-2
    Linton, Richard H. ; McSwane, David Z. / Food Safety Post-processing : Transportation, Supermarkets, and Restaurants. Foodborne Infections and Intoxications. Elsevier Inc., 2013. pp. 479-496
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