From bedside to bench and back: Translating ASD models

Hayley P. Drozd, Sotirios F. Karathanasis, Andrei I. Molosh, Jodi L. Lukkes, D. Clapp, Anantha Shekhar

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) represent a heterogeneous group of disorders defined by deficits in social interaction/communication and restricted interests, behaviors, or activities. Models of ASD, developed based on clinical data and observations, are used in basic science, the “bench,” to better understand the pathophysiology of ASD and provide therapeutic options for patients in the clinic, the “bedside.” Translational medicine creates a bridge between the bench and bedside that allows for clinical and basic science discoveries to challenge one another to improve the opportunities to bring novel therapies to patients. From the clinical side, biomarker work is expanding our understanding of possible mechanisms of ASD through measures of behavior, genetics, imaging modalities, and serum markers. These biomarkers could help to subclassify patients with ASD in order to better target treatments to a more homogeneous groups of patients most likely to respond to a candidate therapy. In turn, basic science has been responding to developments in clinical evaluation by improving bench models to mechanistically and phenotypically recapitulate the ASD phenotypes observed in clinic. While genetic models are identifying novel therapeutics targets at the bench, the clinical efforts are making progress by defining better outcome measures that are most representative of meaningful patient responses. In this review, we discuss some of these challenges in translational research in ASD and strategies for the bench and bedside to bridge the gap to achieve better benefits to patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProgress in Brain Research
PublisherElsevier B.V.
Pages113-158
Number of pages46
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Publication series

NameProgress in Brain Research
Volume241
ISSN (Print)0079-6123
ISSN (Electronic)1875-7855

Fingerprint

Translational Medical Research
Biomarkers
Patient Advocacy
Therapeutics
Genetic Models
Interpersonal Relations
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Communication
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Phenotype

Keywords

  • Animal models
  • ASD treatment
  • Autism
  • Biomarkers
  • Translational medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Drozd, H. P., Karathanasis, S. F., Molosh, A. I., Lukkes, J. L., Clapp, D., & Shekhar, A. (2018). From bedside to bench and back: Translating ASD models. In Progress in Brain Research (pp. 113-158). (Progress in Brain Research; Vol. 241). Elsevier B.V.. https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.pbr.2018.10.003

From bedside to bench and back : Translating ASD models. / Drozd, Hayley P.; Karathanasis, Sotirios F.; Molosh, Andrei I.; Lukkes, Jodi L.; Clapp, D.; Shekhar, Anantha.

Progress in Brain Research. Elsevier B.V., 2018. p. 113-158 (Progress in Brain Research; Vol. 241).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Drozd, HP, Karathanasis, SF, Molosh, AI, Lukkes, JL, Clapp, D & Shekhar, A 2018, From bedside to bench and back: Translating ASD models. in Progress in Brain Research. Progress in Brain Research, vol. 241, Elsevier B.V., pp. 113-158. https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.pbr.2018.10.003
Drozd HP, Karathanasis SF, Molosh AI, Lukkes JL, Clapp D, Shekhar A. From bedside to bench and back: Translating ASD models. In Progress in Brain Research. Elsevier B.V. 2018. p. 113-158. (Progress in Brain Research). https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.pbr.2018.10.003
Drozd, Hayley P. ; Karathanasis, Sotirios F. ; Molosh, Andrei I. ; Lukkes, Jodi L. ; Clapp, D. ; Shekhar, Anantha. / From bedside to bench and back : Translating ASD models. Progress in Brain Research. Elsevier B.V., 2018. pp. 113-158 (Progress in Brain Research).
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