Functional correlates of fiber architecture of the lateral caudal musculature in prehensile and nonprehensile tails of the platyrrhini (primates) and procyonidae (carnivora)

Jason M. Organ, Mark F. Teaford, Andrea B. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prehensile-tailed platyrrhines (atelines and Cebus) and procyonids (Potos) display bony tail features that have been functionally and adaptively linked to their prehensile behaviors, particularly the need to resist relatively greater bending and torsional stresses associated with supporting their body weight during suspensory postures. We compared fiber architecture of the mm. intertransversarii caudae (ITC), the prime tail lateral flexors/rotators, in 40 individuals distributed across 8 platyrrhine and 2 procyonid genera, divided into one of two groups: prehensile or nonprehensile. We tested the hypothesis that prehensile-tailed taxa exhibit relatively greater physiologic cross-sectional areas (PCSAs) to maintain tail suspensory postures for extended periods. As an architectural tradeoff of maximizing force, we also predicted prehensile-tailed taxa would exhibit relatively shorter, more pinnate fibers, and a lower mass to tetanic tension ratio (Mass/ PO). Prehensile-tailed taxa have relatively higher PCSAs in all tail regions, indicating their capacity to generate relatively greater maximum muscle forces compared to nonprehensile-tailed taxa. Contrary to our predictions, there are no group differences in pinnation angles, fiber lengths or M/PO ratios. Therefore, the relatively greater prehensile PCSAs are driven largely by relative increase in muscle mass. These findings suggest that relatively greater ITC PCSAs can be functionally linked to the need for prehensile-tailed taxa to suspend and support their body weight during arboreal behaviors. Moreover, maximizing ITC force production may not come at the expense of muscle excursion/contraction velocity. One advantage of this architectural configuration is it facilitates suspension of the body while simultaneously maximizing tail contact with the substrate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)827-841
Number of pages15
JournalAnatomical Record
Volume292
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 30 2009

Fingerprint

Procyonidae
Carnivora
Platyrrhini
Paraspinal Muscles
primate
Primates
Tail
muscle
tail
posture
Posture
Body Weight
Cebus
Muscles
contraction
Muscle Contraction
muscles
body weight
muscle contraction
substrate

Keywords

  • Coati
  • Fiber length
  • Intertransversarii caudae musculature
  • Kinkajou
  • Muscle cross-sectional area
  • Platyrrhines
  • Prehensility
  • Tail biomechanics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Biotechnology
  • Histology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Functional correlates of fiber architecture of the lateral caudal musculature in prehensile and nonprehensile tails of the platyrrhini (primates) and procyonidae (carnivora). / Organ, Jason M.; Teaford, Mark F.; Taylor, Andrea B.

In: Anatomical Record, Vol. 292, No. 6, 30.07.2009, p. 827-841.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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