Functional impairment of bone formation in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis

The bone marrow regenerative competence

Joseph Bidwell, Marta B. Alvarez, Mark Hood, Paul Childress

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The skeleton is a high-renewal organ that undergoes ongoing cycles of remodeling. The regenerative bone formation arm ultimately declines in the aging, postmenopausal skeleton, but current therapies do not adequately address this deficit. Bone marrow is the primary source of the skeletal anabolic response and the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which give rise to bone matrix-producing osteoblasts. The identity of these stem cells is emerging, but it now appears that the term 'MSC' has often been misapplied to the bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC), a progeny of the MSC. Nevertheless, the changes in BMSC phenotype associated with age and estrogen depletion likely contribute to the attenuated regenerative competence of the marrow and may reflect alterations in MSC phenotype. Here we summarize current concepts in bone marrow MSC identity, and within this context, review recent observations on changes in bone marrow population dynamics associated with aging and menopause.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)117-125
Number of pages9
JournalCurrent Osteoporosis Reports
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2013

Fingerprint

Mesenchymal Stromal Cells
Osteogenesis
Mental Competency
Osteoporosis
Bone Marrow
Skeleton
Arm Bones
Phenotype
Bone Matrix
Population Dynamics
Menopause
Osteoblasts
Estrogens
Stem Cells

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Mesenchymal stem cells
  • Nmp4
  • Osteoblasts
  • Osteoprogenitors
  • Postmenopause

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Functional impairment of bone formation in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis : The bone marrow regenerative competence. / Bidwell, Joseph; Alvarez, Marta B.; Hood, Mark; Childress, Paul.

In: Current Osteoporosis Reports, Vol. 11, No. 2, 06.2013, p. 117-125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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