Functional MRI studies of memory in aging, mild cognitive impairment, and alzheimer's disease

Shannon L. Risacher, Heather A. Wishart, Andrew Saykin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In the human brain, functionally and anatomically defined systems exist for encoding, consolidating, and retrieving memories of experiences (episodic memory); accumulating and accessing factual information in a body of knowledge (semantic memory); and actively processing and manipulating information (working memory). These three memory systems can be distinguished from other nondeclarative memory systems such as procedural learning and priming [1-4]. Brain-behavior studies using a variety of approaches from lesion-based research to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) demonstrate distinct though highly interrelated neural circuitry for episodic, semantic, and working memory [3, 5]. Each of these memory systems, despite their close interaction, is affected somewhat differently by aging and dementia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationFunctional Neuroradiology: Principles and Clinical Applications
PublisherSpringer US
Pages419-453
Number of pages35
ISBN (Print)9781441903457, 9781441903433
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Functional MRI studies of memory in aging, mild cognitive impairment, and alzheimer's disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Risacher, S. L., Wishart, H. A., & Saykin, A. (2012). Functional MRI studies of memory in aging, mild cognitive impairment, and alzheimer's disease. In Functional Neuroradiology: Principles and Clinical Applications (pp. 419-453). Springer US. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0345-7_24