Gain in target dose from using computer controlled radiation therapy (CCRT) in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer

Chul S. Ha, Peter K. Kijewski, Mark Langer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: A study was undertaken to evaluate the gain from Computer Controlled Radiation Therapy in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. The purpose of this study is two-fold: (a) to measure the gain in the minimum target dose provided by Computer Controlled Radiation Therapy and (b) to determine the change in the minimum target dose as a function of the lung tolerance limits. Methods and Materials: Six cases of non-small cell lung cancer were studied by simulating treatments with conventional and Computer Controlled Radiation Therapy techniques. For conventional treatments, a boost dose was delivered to the gross tumor volume via a pair of opposed oblique fields with a fixed gantry angle. For Computer Controlled Radiation Therapy, the gantry angle was allowed to change along the longitudinal axis of the patient. Prescriptions had to satisfy a bound on the maximum dose in the spinal cord and a limit on the amount of contralateral lung which could exceed 20 Gy. The boost dose was increased until either a tolerance limit was reached or minimum target dose of 80 Gy was delivered. Results: A minimum target dose of 80 Gy could be given to three of four patients who could not receive 80 Gy with conventional therapy. A minimum target dose of 80 Gy could be given to the remaining two patients with either technique. Conclusion: The gain from computer controlled radiation therapy strongly depended on the chosen lung tolerance limit. A 10 to 20 Gy gain in minimum target dose could be found for some patients, but the gain was significantly reduced for a relatively small decrease in the amount of lung permitted a dose above 20 Gy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)335-339
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 20 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
lungs
radiation therapy
Radiotherapy
cancer
dosage
Lung
Therapeutics
gantry cranes
acceleration (physics)
Tumor Burden
Prescriptions
Spinal Cord
spinal cord
therapy
tumors

Keywords

  • Computer controlled radiation therapy
  • Dose volume histogram
  • Lung cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiation

Cite this

Gain in target dose from using computer controlled radiation therapy (CCRT) in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. / Ha, Chul S.; Kijewski, Peter K.; Langer, Mark.

In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, Vol. 26, No. 2, 20.05.1993, p. 335-339.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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