Gastrocystoplasty: Long-term followup

William DeFoor, Eugene Minevich, Deborah Reeves, Leslie Tackett, Jeffrey Wacksman, Curtis Sheldon, Richard Rink

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The use of stomach has become controversial in pediatric lower urinary tract reconstruction. Recent series have reported a high incidence of hematuria-dysuria syndrome and metabolic abnormalities, which has prompted a significant decrease in its use at our institution during the last 5 years. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of children who underwent urinary reconstruction with gastrocystoplasty. Patients were excluded from consideration if they had less than 5 years of followup. Results: From 1989 to 1997, 18 males and 26 females were identified. Median patient age at time of reconstruction was 4.5 years and median followup was 9.8 years. Urinary continence was present in 89% of cases, and upper tract dilatation was stable or improved in 91%. No patient had chronic metabolic alkalosis. Major surgery was required for complications of the gastrocystoplasty in 6 cases, including patch contraction and ureteral obstruction necessitating excision in 1. Two patients had severe hematuria while anuric from renal failure which was managed conservatively with bladder cycling and H2 blockers. Symptoms resolved completely after renal transplantation in both cases. Febrile urinary tract infection occurred in 20% of cases and asymptomatic bacteriuria was present in 36%. Conclusions: The use of stomach segments in pediatric urinary reconstruction can be beneficial in patients with chronic renal insufficiency, metabolic acidosis or short gut syndrome. Despite negative reports concerning serious complications of gastrocystoplasty, our long-term data confirm that it remains an important option in our reconstruction armamentarium.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1647-1650
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume170
Issue number4 II
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Hematuria
Stomach
Pediatrics
Dysuria
Ureteral Obstruction
Alkalosis
Bacteriuria
Acidosis
Urinary Tract
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Urinary Tract Infections
Kidney Transplantation
Medical Records
Renal Insufficiency
Dilatation
Urinary Bladder
Fever
Incidence
SHORT syndrome

Keywords

  • Cystoplasty
  • Gastroplasty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

DeFoor, W., Minevich, E., Reeves, D., Tackett, L., Wacksman, J., Sheldon, C., & Rink, R. (2003). Gastrocystoplasty: Long-term followup. Journal of Urology, 170(4 II), 1647-1650. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.ju.0000091220.86291.96

Gastrocystoplasty : Long-term followup. / DeFoor, William; Minevich, Eugene; Reeves, Deborah; Tackett, Leslie; Wacksman, Jeffrey; Sheldon, Curtis; Rink, Richard.

In: Journal of Urology, Vol. 170, No. 4 II, 01.10.2003, p. 1647-1650.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DeFoor, W, Minevich, E, Reeves, D, Tackett, L, Wacksman, J, Sheldon, C & Rink, R 2003, 'Gastrocystoplasty: Long-term followup', Journal of Urology, vol. 170, no. 4 II, pp. 1647-1650. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.ju.0000091220.86291.96
DeFoor W, Minevich E, Reeves D, Tackett L, Wacksman J, Sheldon C et al. Gastrocystoplasty: Long-term followup. Journal of Urology. 2003 Oct 1;170(4 II):1647-1650. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.ju.0000091220.86291.96
DeFoor, William ; Minevich, Eugene ; Reeves, Deborah ; Tackett, Leslie ; Wacksman, Jeffrey ; Sheldon, Curtis ; Rink, Richard. / Gastrocystoplasty : Long-term followup. In: Journal of Urology. 2003 ; Vol. 170, No. 4 II. pp. 1647-1650.
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