Gender, quality of life, and mental disorders in primary care

Results from the PRIME-md 1000 study

Mark Linzer, Robert Spitzer, Kurt Kroenke, Janet B. Williams, Steven Hahn, David Brody, Frank DeGruy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

157 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Recently there has been increased interest in the special mental health needs of women. We used data from the PRIME-MD 1000 study to assess gender differences in the frequency of mental disorders in primary care settings, and to explore the potential impact of these differences on health-related quality of life (HRQL). SUBJECTS AND METHODS: One thousand primary care patients (559 women) were interviewed during the PRIME-MD study, which was conducted at four primary care clinics affiliated with university hospitals throughout the eastern United States. Patients completed a one-page questionnaire in the waiting room prior to being seen by the physician; patients and physicians then completed together a clinician evaluation guide that used DSM-III-R algorithms to diagnose mood, anxiety, somatoform, eating, and alcohol related disorders. Health-related quality of life was assessed with the Medical Outcomes Study SF-20 General Health Survey. RESULTS: Women were more likely than men to have at least one mental disorder (43% versus 33%, P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)526-533
Number of pages8
JournalThe American Journal of Medicine
Volume101
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Mental Disorders
Primary Health Care
Quality of Life
Alcohol-Related Disorders
Physicians
Health Surveys
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Mental Health
Anxiety
Eating
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Gender, quality of life, and mental disorders in primary care : Results from the PRIME-md 1000 study. / Linzer, Mark; Spitzer, Robert; Kroenke, Kurt; Williams, Janet B.; Hahn, Steven; Brody, David; DeGruy, Frank.

In: The American Journal of Medicine, Vol. 101, No. 5, 11.1996, p. 526-533.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Linzer, Mark ; Spitzer, Robert ; Kroenke, Kurt ; Williams, Janet B. ; Hahn, Steven ; Brody, David ; DeGruy, Frank. / Gender, quality of life, and mental disorders in primary care : Results from the PRIME-md 1000 study. In: The American Journal of Medicine. 1996 ; Vol. 101, No. 5. pp. 526-533.
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