Genes contributing to the development of alcoholism: an overview

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Genetic factors (i.e., variations in specific genes) account for a substantial portion of the risk for alcoholism. However, identifying those genes and the specific variations involved is challenging. Researchers have used both case-control and family studies to identify genes related to alcoholism risk. In addition, different strategies such as candidate gene analyses and genome-wide association studies have been used. The strongest effects have been found for specific variants of genes that encode two enzymes involved in alcohol metabolism-alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase. Accumulating evidence indicates that variations in numerous other genes have smaller but measurable effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)336-338
Number of pages3
JournalAlcohol research : current reviews
Volume34
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Alcoholism
Genes
Aldehyde Dehydrogenase
Alcohol Dehydrogenase
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genetic Association Studies
Case-Control Studies
Alcohols
Research Personnel
Enzymes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Genes contributing to the development of alcoholism : an overview. / Edenberg, Howard.

In: Alcohol research : current reviews, Vol. 34, No. 3, 2012, p. 336-338.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

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