Genetic and childhood trauma interaction effect on age of onset in bipolar disorder

An exploratory analysis

BiGS Collaborative, Daniel L. Koller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction This study investigated whether early life trauma mediates genetic effects on the age at onset (AAO) of bipolar disorder. Method Data from the BiGS Consortium case samples (N=1119) were used. Childhood traumatic events were documented using the Childhood Life Events Scale (CLES). Interaction between occurrence of childhood trauma and common genetic variants throughout the genome was tested to identify single nucleotide polymorphic gene variants (SNPs) whose effects on bipolar AAO differ between individuals clearly exposed (CLES2) and not exposed (CLES=0) to childhood trauma. Results The modal response to the CLES was 0 (N=480), but an additional 276 subjects had CLES=1, and 363 subjects reported 2 or more traumatic lifetime events. The distribution of age at onset showed a broad peak between ages 12 and 18, with the majority of subjects having onset during that period, and a significant decrease in age of onset with the number of traumatic events. No single SNP showed a statistically significant interaction with the presence of traumatic events to impact bipolar age at onset. However, SNPs in or near genes coding for calcium channel activity-related proteins (Gene Ontology: 0005262) were found to be more likely than other SNPs to show evidence of interaction using the INRICH method (p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-5
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume179
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Bipolar Disorder
Age of Onset
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Wounds and Injuries
Gene Ontology
Calcium Channels
Genes
Nucleotides
Genome
Proteins

Keywords

  • Age of onset
  • Bipolar disorder
  • Calcium
  • Childhood trauma
  • Genetic
  • GWAS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Genetic and childhood trauma interaction effect on age of onset in bipolar disorder : An exploratory analysis. / BiGS Collaborative; Koller, Daniel L.

In: Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol. 179, 2015, p. 1-5.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{7a2bb6160bda4261bba085d9f3ac7c70,
title = "Genetic and childhood trauma interaction effect on age of onset in bipolar disorder: An exploratory analysis",
abstract = "Introduction This study investigated whether early life trauma mediates genetic effects on the age at onset (AAO) of bipolar disorder. Method Data from the BiGS Consortium case samples (N=1119) were used. Childhood traumatic events were documented using the Childhood Life Events Scale (CLES). Interaction between occurrence of childhood trauma and common genetic variants throughout the genome was tested to identify single nucleotide polymorphic gene variants (SNPs) whose effects on bipolar AAO differ between individuals clearly exposed (CLES2) and not exposed (CLES=0) to childhood trauma. Results The modal response to the CLES was 0 (N=480), but an additional 276 subjects had CLES=1, and 363 subjects reported 2 or more traumatic lifetime events. The distribution of age at onset showed a broad peak between ages 12 and 18, with the majority of subjects having onset during that period, and a significant decrease in age of onset with the number of traumatic events. No single SNP showed a statistically significant interaction with the presence of traumatic events to impact bipolar age at onset. However, SNPs in or near genes coding for calcium channel activity-related proteins (Gene Ontology: 0005262) were found to be more likely than other SNPs to show evidence of interaction using the INRICH method (p",
keywords = "Age of onset, Bipolar disorder, Calcium, Childhood trauma, Genetic, GWAS",
author = "{BiGS Collaborative} and Koller, {Daniel L.} and Koller, {Daniel L.} and Lawson, {William B.} and Gershon, {Elliot S.} and John Nurnberger",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1016/j.jad.2015.02.029",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "179",
pages = "1--5",
journal = "Journal of Affective Disorders",
issn = "0165-0327",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Genetic and childhood trauma interaction effect on age of onset in bipolar disorder

T2 - An exploratory analysis

AU - BiGS Collaborative

AU - Koller, Daniel L.

AU - Koller, Daniel L.

AU - Lawson, William B.

AU - Gershon, Elliot S.

AU - Nurnberger, John

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Introduction This study investigated whether early life trauma mediates genetic effects on the age at onset (AAO) of bipolar disorder. Method Data from the BiGS Consortium case samples (N=1119) were used. Childhood traumatic events were documented using the Childhood Life Events Scale (CLES). Interaction between occurrence of childhood trauma and common genetic variants throughout the genome was tested to identify single nucleotide polymorphic gene variants (SNPs) whose effects on bipolar AAO differ between individuals clearly exposed (CLES2) and not exposed (CLES=0) to childhood trauma. Results The modal response to the CLES was 0 (N=480), but an additional 276 subjects had CLES=1, and 363 subjects reported 2 or more traumatic lifetime events. The distribution of age at onset showed a broad peak between ages 12 and 18, with the majority of subjects having onset during that period, and a significant decrease in age of onset with the number of traumatic events. No single SNP showed a statistically significant interaction with the presence of traumatic events to impact bipolar age at onset. However, SNPs in or near genes coding for calcium channel activity-related proteins (Gene Ontology: 0005262) were found to be more likely than other SNPs to show evidence of interaction using the INRICH method (p

AB - Introduction This study investigated whether early life trauma mediates genetic effects on the age at onset (AAO) of bipolar disorder. Method Data from the BiGS Consortium case samples (N=1119) were used. Childhood traumatic events were documented using the Childhood Life Events Scale (CLES). Interaction between occurrence of childhood trauma and common genetic variants throughout the genome was tested to identify single nucleotide polymorphic gene variants (SNPs) whose effects on bipolar AAO differ between individuals clearly exposed (CLES2) and not exposed (CLES=0) to childhood trauma. Results The modal response to the CLES was 0 (N=480), but an additional 276 subjects had CLES=1, and 363 subjects reported 2 or more traumatic lifetime events. The distribution of age at onset showed a broad peak between ages 12 and 18, with the majority of subjects having onset during that period, and a significant decrease in age of onset with the number of traumatic events. No single SNP showed a statistically significant interaction with the presence of traumatic events to impact bipolar age at onset. However, SNPs in or near genes coding for calcium channel activity-related proteins (Gene Ontology: 0005262) were found to be more likely than other SNPs to show evidence of interaction using the INRICH method (p

KW - Age of onset

KW - Bipolar disorder

KW - Calcium

KW - Childhood trauma

KW - Genetic

KW - GWAS

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84943537104&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84943537104&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jad.2015.02.029

DO - 10.1016/j.jad.2015.02.029

M3 - Article

VL - 179

SP - 1

EP - 5

JO - Journal of Affective Disorders

JF - Journal of Affective Disorders

SN - 0165-0327

ER -