Genetics of alcoholism

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Multiple lines of evidence strongly indicate that genetic factors contribute to the risk for alcohol use disorders (AUD). There is substantial heterogeneity in AUD, which complicates studies seeking to identify specific genetic factors. To identify these genetic effects, several different alcohol-related phenotypes have been analyzed, including diagnosis and quantitative measures related to AUDs. Study designs have used candidate gene analyses, genetic linkage studies, genomewide association studies (GWAS), and analyses of rare variants. Two genes that encode enzymes of alcohol metabolism have the strongest effect on AUD: aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 and alcohol dehydrogenase 1B each has strongly protective variants that reduce risk, with odds ratios approximately 0.2-0.4. A number of other genes important in AUD have been identified and replicated, including GABRA2 and alcohol dehydrogenases 1B and 4. GWAS have identified additional candidates. Rare variants are likely also to play a role studies of these are just beginning. A multifaceted approach to gene identification, targeting both rare and common variations and assembling much larger datasets for meta-analyses, is critical for identifying the key genes and pathways important in AUD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)561-571
Number of pages11
JournalHandbook of Clinical Neurology
Volume125
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Alcoholism
Alcohols
Genes
Aldehyde Dehydrogenase
Genetic Linkage
Gene Targeting
Alcohol Dehydrogenase
Genetic Association Studies
Meta-Analysis
Odds Ratio
Phenotype
Enzymes

Keywords

  • Alcohol dependence
  • Endophenotypes
  • Genetic risk factors
  • Genomewide association study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Genetics of alcoholism. / Edenberg, Howard; Foroud, Tatiana.

In: Handbook of Clinical Neurology, Vol. 125, 2014, p. 561-571.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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