Globular glial tauopathies (GGT): Consensus recommendations

Zeshan Ahmed, Eileen H. Bigio, Herbert Budka, Dennis W. Dickson, Isidro Ferrer, Bernardino Ghetti, Giorgio Giaccone, Kimmo J. Hatanpaa, Janice L. Holton, Keith A. Josephs, James Powers, Salvatore Spina, Hitoshi Takahashi, Charles L. White, Tamas Revesz, Gabor G. Kovacs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

90 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent studies have highlighted a group of 4-repeat (4R) tauopathies that are characterised neuropathologically by widespread, globular glial inclusions (GGIs). Tau immunohistochemistry reveals 4R immunoreactive globular oligodendroglial and astrocytic inclusions and the latter are predominantly negative for Gallyas silver staining. These cases are associated with a range of clinical presentations, which correlate with the severity and distribution of underlying tau pathology and neurodegeneration. Their heterogeneous clinicopathological features combined with their rarity and under-recognition have led to cases characterised by GGIs being described in the literature using various and redundant terminologies. In this report, a group of neuropathologists form a consensus on the terminology and classification of cases with GGIs. After studying microscopic images from previously reported cases with suspected GGIs (n = 22), this panel of neuropathologists with extensive experience in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases and a documented record of previous experience with at least one case with GGIs, agreed that (1) GGIs were present in all the cases reviewed; (2) the morphology of globular astrocytic inclusions was different to tufted astrocytes and finally that (3) the cases represented a number of different neuropathological subtypes. They also agreed that the different morphological subtypes are likely to be part of a spectrum of a distinct disease entity, for which they recommend that the overarching term globular glial tauopathy (GGT) should be used. Type I cases typically present with frontotemporal dementia, which correlates with the fronto-temporal distribution of pathology. Type II cases are characterised by pyramidal features reflecting motor cortex involvement and corticospinal tract degeneration. Type III cases can present with a combination of frontotemporal dementia and motor neuron disease with fronto-temporal cortex, motor cortex and corticospinal tract being severely affected. Extrapyramidal features can be present in Type II and III cases and significant degeneration of the white matter is a feature of all GGT subtypes. Improved detection and classification will be necessary for the establishment of neuropathological and clinical diagnostic research criteria in the future.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)537-544
Number of pages8
JournalActa Neuropathologica
Volume126
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

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Tauopathies
Neuroglia
Consensus
Pyramidal Tracts
Motor Cortex
Terminology
Pathology
Frontotemporal Dementia
Silver Staining
Temporal Lobe
Astrocytes
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Immunohistochemistry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Ahmed, Z., Bigio, E. H., Budka, H., Dickson, D. W., Ferrer, I., Ghetti, B., ... Kovacs, G. G. (2013). Globular glial tauopathies (GGT): Consensus recommendations. Acta Neuropathologica, 126(4), 537-544. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00401-013-1171-0

Globular glial tauopathies (GGT) : Consensus recommendations. / Ahmed, Zeshan; Bigio, Eileen H.; Budka, Herbert; Dickson, Dennis W.; Ferrer, Isidro; Ghetti, Bernardino; Giaccone, Giorgio; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Holton, Janice L.; Josephs, Keith A.; Powers, James; Spina, Salvatore; Takahashi, Hitoshi; White, Charles L.; Revesz, Tamas; Kovacs, Gabor G.

In: Acta Neuropathologica, Vol. 126, No. 4, 2013, p. 537-544.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ahmed, Z, Bigio, EH, Budka, H, Dickson, DW, Ferrer, I, Ghetti, B, Giaccone, G, Hatanpaa, KJ, Holton, JL, Josephs, KA, Powers, J, Spina, S, Takahashi, H, White, CL, Revesz, T & Kovacs, GG 2013, 'Globular glial tauopathies (GGT): Consensus recommendations', Acta Neuropathologica, vol. 126, no. 4, pp. 537-544. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00401-013-1171-0
Ahmed, Zeshan ; Bigio, Eileen H. ; Budka, Herbert ; Dickson, Dennis W. ; Ferrer, Isidro ; Ghetti, Bernardino ; Giaccone, Giorgio ; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J. ; Holton, Janice L. ; Josephs, Keith A. ; Powers, James ; Spina, Salvatore ; Takahashi, Hitoshi ; White, Charles L. ; Revesz, Tamas ; Kovacs, Gabor G. / Globular glial tauopathies (GGT) : Consensus recommendations. In: Acta Neuropathologica. 2013 ; Vol. 126, No. 4. pp. 537-544.
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