Gonadal steroid preservation of central synaptic input to hamster facial motoneurons following peripheral axotomy

Kathryn Jones, Thomas E. Durica, Susan K. Jacob

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In recent work, we have demonstrated that testosterone propionate accelerates recovery from facial nerve injury in the adult male hamster. Central synaptic stripping following peripheral motor neuron damage is a well-established component of the injury response. Gonadal steroids regulate synaptogenesis in the normal nervous system. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that testosterone propionate administration at the time of facial nerve transection alters the synaptic connectivity of injured facial motoneurons. Adult hamsters were subjected to right facial nerve transection at the level of the stylomastoid foramen. Half the animals received subcutaneous implants of testosterone propionate; the other half were sham implanted. At 5 days postoperative, the animals were killed by intracardiac perfusion-fixation, and the control and axotomized facial nuclear groups from the brainstems of nonhormone- and testosterone propionate-treated animals processed for routine transmission electron microscopy. Quantiative analysis of the synaptic ratio (percent somal membrane covered by synaptic profiles) and the average length of axosomatic synapses was accomplished. The results indicate that axotomy alone resulted in an 81% reduction in the synaptic ratio and a 26% decrease in the average synaptic length of axosomatic synapses. Exposure to testosterone propionate from the time of facial nerve transection resulted in only a 48% reduction in the synaptic ratio and a 16%, decrease in the average synaptic length of axosomatic synapses following injury. Thus, testosterone propionate significantly attenuated the amount of synaptic stripping that occurred at 5 days postoperative and the decrease in average length of the remaining synapses as well. It is concluded that gonadal steroids modulate central synaptic plasticity following peripheral nerve injury. The results are discussed in light of our recent findings of steroidal effects on the central astrocyctic response to facial nerve injury as well.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)257-266
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Neurocytology
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Testosterone Propionate
Axotomy
Motor Neurons
Cricetinae
Steroids
Synapses
Facial Nerve
Facial Nerve Injuries
Peripheral Nerve Injuries
Synaptic Membranes
Neuronal Plasticity
Wounds and Injuries
Transmission Electron Microscopy
Nervous System
Brain Stem
Perfusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Anatomy
  • Cell Biology
  • Histology

Cite this

Gonadal steroid preservation of central synaptic input to hamster facial motoneurons following peripheral axotomy. / Jones, Kathryn; Durica, Thomas E.; Jacob, Susan K.

In: Journal of Neurocytology, Vol. 26, No. 4, 1997, p. 257-266.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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