Gonadal teratomas

A review and speculation

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Teratomas of the ovary and testis are confusing because, despite histologic similarities, they exhibit different biologic behaviors, depending mostly on the site of occurrence and the age of the patient. Thus, most ovarian teratomas are benign, and most testicular teratomas are malignant, with the exception of those occurring in children. These general statements, however, do not hold true for ovarian teratomas that are "immature" or exhibit "malignant transformation" and for dermoid and epidermoid cysts of the testis, categories of ovarian and testicular teratomas that are malignant and benign, respectively. This review concentrates on some of the "newer" observations concerning these interesting and confusing neoplasms, including diagnostically deceptive patterns. It is the author's opinion that much of the confusion regarding gonadal teratomas can be clarified by the concept that the usual ovarian teratoma derives from a benign germ cell in a parthenogenetic-like fashion, whereas the typical postpubertal testicular example derives from a malignant germ cell, mostly after evolution of that originally malignant cell to an invasive germ cell tumor (ie, embryonal carcinoma, yolk sac tumor, etc). The postpubertal testicular teratomas can therefore be thought of as an end-stage pattern of differentiation of a malignant germ cell tumor. The pediatric testicular teratomas, as well as dermoid and epidermoid cysts of the testis, however, must derive from benign germ cells, in a fashion similar to most ovarian teratomas. The teratomatous components of mixed germ cell tumors of the ovary, on the other hand, likely have a pathogenesis similar to that of postpubertal testicular teratomas.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10-23
Number of pages14
JournalAdvances in Anatomic Pathology
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004

Fingerprint

Teratoma
Germ Cell and Embryonal Neoplasms
Germ Cells
Testis
Epidermal Cyst
Dermoid Cyst
Ovary
Embryonal Carcinoma
Endodermal Sinus Tumor
Ovarian Teratoma
Testicular Teratoma
Pediatrics
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Dermoid cyst
  • Germ cell tumor
  • Gonadal teratoma
  • Histogenesis
  • Ovarian neoplasms
  • Testicular neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Anatomy

Cite this

Gonadal teratomas : A review and speculation. / Ulbright, Thomas.

In: Advances in Anatomic Pathology, Vol. 11, No. 1, 2004, p. 10-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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