Having a first-degree relative with melanoma increases lifetime risk of melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma

Erin X. Wei, Xin Li, Hongmei Nan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Previous studies have found familial aggregation of melanoma and keratinocyte cancers (KCs). Objective: We sought to determine the risk of melanoma and KCs in those with a positive family history of melanoma while controlling for pigmentary and environmental risk factors. Methods: We prospectively followed 216,115 participants from the Nurses' Health Study, Nurse's Health Study 2, and Health Professionals Follow-up Study for more than 20 years. Cox proportional hazards regression controlling for known risk factors for skin cancer was used to estimate association between family history of melanoma and melanoma and KCs. Results: Compared with those without a family history of melanoma, individuals with a family history of melanoma had a 74% increased risk of melanoma (hazard ratio [HR], 1.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.45-2.09), a 22% increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma (HR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.06-1.40), and a 27% increased risk of basal cell carcinoma (HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.12-1.44). Family history of melanoma increased the risk of development of truncal melanoma in both sexes, extremity melanoma in women, and extremity squamous cell carcinoma in women. Limitations: Limitations of this study include self-reported family history and detection bias. Conclusion: Individuals with a family history of melanoma are at an increased risk of melanoma and KCs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Dermatology
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

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Basal Cell Carcinoma
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Melanoma
Keratinocytes
Confidence Intervals
Neoplasms
Health
Extremities
Nurses
Skin Neoplasms

Keywords

  • basal cell carcinoma
  • family history of melanoma
  • keratinocyte cancers
  • melanoma
  • prospective cohort studies
  • risk factor
  • skin cancer
  • squamous cell carcinoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

@article{17af937915c44e60b0074df2f7465325,
title = "Having a first-degree relative with melanoma increases lifetime risk of melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and basal cell carcinoma",
abstract = "Background: Previous studies have found familial aggregation of melanoma and keratinocyte cancers (KCs). Objective: We sought to determine the risk of melanoma and KCs in those with a positive family history of melanoma while controlling for pigmentary and environmental risk factors. Methods: We prospectively followed 216,115 participants from the Nurses' Health Study, Nurse's Health Study 2, and Health Professionals Follow-up Study for more than 20 years. Cox proportional hazards regression controlling for known risk factors for skin cancer was used to estimate association between family history of melanoma and melanoma and KCs. Results: Compared with those without a family history of melanoma, individuals with a family history of melanoma had a 74{\%} increased risk of melanoma (hazard ratio [HR], 1.74; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.45-2.09), a 22{\%} increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma (HR, 1.22; 95{\%} CI, 1.06-1.40), and a 27{\%} increased risk of basal cell carcinoma (HR, 1.27; 95{\%} CI, 1.12-1.44). Family history of melanoma increased the risk of development of truncal melanoma in both sexes, extremity melanoma in women, and extremity squamous cell carcinoma in women. Limitations: Limitations of this study include self-reported family history and detection bias. Conclusion: Individuals with a family history of melanoma are at an increased risk of melanoma and KCs.",
keywords = "basal cell carcinoma, family history of melanoma, keratinocyte cancers, melanoma, prospective cohort studies, risk factor, skin cancer, squamous cell carcinoma",
author = "Wei, {Erin X.} and Xin Li and Hongmei Nan",
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AU - Wei, Erin X.

AU - Li, Xin

AU - Nan, Hongmei

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N2 - Background: Previous studies have found familial aggregation of melanoma and keratinocyte cancers (KCs). Objective: We sought to determine the risk of melanoma and KCs in those with a positive family history of melanoma while controlling for pigmentary and environmental risk factors. Methods: We prospectively followed 216,115 participants from the Nurses' Health Study, Nurse's Health Study 2, and Health Professionals Follow-up Study for more than 20 years. Cox proportional hazards regression controlling for known risk factors for skin cancer was used to estimate association between family history of melanoma and melanoma and KCs. Results: Compared with those without a family history of melanoma, individuals with a family history of melanoma had a 74% increased risk of melanoma (hazard ratio [HR], 1.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.45-2.09), a 22% increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma (HR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.06-1.40), and a 27% increased risk of basal cell carcinoma (HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.12-1.44). Family history of melanoma increased the risk of development of truncal melanoma in both sexes, extremity melanoma in women, and extremity squamous cell carcinoma in women. Limitations: Limitations of this study include self-reported family history and detection bias. Conclusion: Individuals with a family history of melanoma are at an increased risk of melanoma and KCs.

AB - Background: Previous studies have found familial aggregation of melanoma and keratinocyte cancers (KCs). Objective: We sought to determine the risk of melanoma and KCs in those with a positive family history of melanoma while controlling for pigmentary and environmental risk factors. Methods: We prospectively followed 216,115 participants from the Nurses' Health Study, Nurse's Health Study 2, and Health Professionals Follow-up Study for more than 20 years. Cox proportional hazards regression controlling for known risk factors for skin cancer was used to estimate association between family history of melanoma and melanoma and KCs. Results: Compared with those without a family history of melanoma, individuals with a family history of melanoma had a 74% increased risk of melanoma (hazard ratio [HR], 1.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.45-2.09), a 22% increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma (HR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.06-1.40), and a 27% increased risk of basal cell carcinoma (HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.12-1.44). Family history of melanoma increased the risk of development of truncal melanoma in both sexes, extremity melanoma in women, and extremity squamous cell carcinoma in women. Limitations: Limitations of this study include self-reported family history and detection bias. Conclusion: Individuals with a family history of melanoma are at an increased risk of melanoma and KCs.

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