Health beliefs and social influence in home safety practices of mothers with preschool children

Kathleen M. Russell, Victoria L. Champion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine relationships among health beliefs, social influence, and home injury proofing-behavior in 140 low-income mothers with preschool children. Data were collected through structured interviews and observations of safety hazards in subjects' homes. Regression analysis showed that the combination of health beliefs, social influence, demographic, and experiential variables accounted for 51% of the variance in hazard accessibility and 44% in hazard frequency. Self efficacy, previous injury experience, knowledge, age, and birth position of the children were significant predictors of home safety practices. Recommendations are offered for practice, research, and health policy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)59-64
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Nursing Scholarship
Volume28
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 1 1996

Fingerprint

Preschool Children
Mothers
Safety
Health
Wounds and Injuries
Self Efficacy
Health Policy
Regression Analysis
Demography
Parturition
Interviews
Research

Keywords

  • Accidents
  • Health beliefs
  • Injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Health beliefs and social influence in home safety practices of mothers with preschool children. / Russell, Kathleen M.; Champion, Victoria L.

In: Journal of Nursing Scholarship, Vol. 28, No. 1, 01.03.1996, p. 59-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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