Health literacy and its association with the use of information sources and with barriers to information seeking in clinic-based pregnant women

Carol Shieh, Rose Mays, Anna McDaniel, Jennifer Yu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated health literacy and its association with the use of information sources and with barriers to information seeking in clinic-based pregnant women. The Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (STOFHLA) was used to measure health literacy in 143 English-speaking low-income pregnant women. About 15% of the participants demonstrated low health literacy. Participants with low health literacy were less likely to use the Internet and more likely to have self-efficacy barriers than participants with high health literacy. Interventions to promote information-seeking skills and Internet access are indicated for women with low health literacy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)971-988
Number of pages18
JournalHealth Care for Women International
Volume30
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

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Health Literacy
Pregnant Women
Internet
Self Efficacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Health literacy and its association with the use of information sources and with barriers to information seeking in clinic-based pregnant women. / Shieh, Carol; Mays, Rose; McDaniel, Anna; Yu, Jennifer.

In: Health Care for Women International, Vol. 30, No. 11, 2009, p. 971-988.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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