Heavy metal poisoning: management of intoxication and antidotes.

Daniel Rusyniak, Anna Arroyo, Jennifer Acciani, Blake Froberg, Louise Kao, R Furbee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Of the known elements, nearly 80% are either metals or metalloids. The highly reactive nature of most metals result in their forming complexes with other compounds such oxygen, sulfide and chloride. Although this reactivity is the primary means by which they are toxic, many metals, in trace amounts, are vital to normal physiological processes; examples include iron in oxygen transport, manganese and selenium in antioxidant defense and zinc in metabolism. With these essential metals toxicity occurs when concentrations are either too low or too high. For some metals there are no physiological concentrations that are beneficial; as such these metals only have the potential to cause toxicity. This chapter focuses on four of these: arsenic, mercury, lead and thallium.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)365-396
Number of pages32
JournalEXS
Volume100
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Antidotes
Metals
Oxygen Compounds
Metalloids
Physiological Phenomena
Thallium
Poisons
Arsenic
Sulfides
Manganese
Selenium
Mercury
Heavy Metal Toxicity
Zinc
Chlorides
Iron
Antioxidants
Oxygen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Heavy metal poisoning : management of intoxication and antidotes. / Rusyniak, Daniel; Arroyo, Anna; Acciani, Jennifer; Froberg, Blake; Kao, Louise; Furbee, R.

In: EXS, Vol. 100, 2010, p. 365-396.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rusyniak, Daniel ; Arroyo, Anna ; Acciani, Jennifer ; Froberg, Blake ; Kao, Louise ; Furbee, R. / Heavy metal poisoning : management of intoxication and antidotes. In: EXS. 2010 ; Vol. 100. pp. 365-396.
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