"Helping babies breathe" training in Sub-Saharan Africa: Educational impact and learner impressions

Rebecca Hoban, Sherri Bucher, Ida Neuman, Minghua Chen, Neghist Tesfaye, Jonathan M. Spector

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Poor resuscitation contributes significantly to neonatal deaths globally. Helping Babies Breathe (HBB) is a new evidence-based neonatal resuscitation curriculum for low-resource settings. Objective: We sought to characterize knowledge changes after national-level HBB training in Ethiopia, factors correlated with successful training, resuscitation skills and trainees" perceptions. Methods: Trainees completed multiple-choice questionnaires (MCQ) before and after a 2-day course. After training, bag-mask ventilation (BMV) skills were assessed and feedback questionnaires completed. Results: Resuscitation knowledge improved from 8.7/10 (SD 1.4) to 9.4/10 (SD 1.1; p=0.003). Correct MCQ responses relating to essential aspects of resuscitation increased 68-79%. Pre-training knowledge differences between physicians and non-physicians disappeared. MCQ scores increased as trainer:trainee ratio decreased (p=0.004). Mean post-HBB BMV scores [5.7/7 (SD 1.6)] were not impacted by trainer:trainee ratio. Conclusions: Ethiopian HBB training improved neonatal resuscitation knowledge and was well received. Lower trainer:trainee ratio was associated with increased MCQ scores. HBB eliminated baseline knowledge differences between Ethiopian healthworker cadres.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberfms077
Pages (from-to)180-186
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Tropical Pediatrics
Volume59
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2013

Fingerprint

Africa South of the Sahara
Resuscitation
Masks
Ethiopia
Curriculum
Surveys and Questionnaires
Physicians

Keywords

  • Developing countries
  • Educational intervention
  • International child health
  • Neonatal mortality
  • Neonatal resuscitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

"Helping babies breathe" training in Sub-Saharan Africa : Educational impact and learner impressions. / Hoban, Rebecca; Bucher, Sherri; Neuman, Ida; Chen, Minghua; Tesfaye, Neghist; Spector, Jonathan M.

In: Journal of Tropical Pediatrics, Vol. 59, No. 3, fms077, 01.06.2013, p. 180-186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hoban, Rebecca ; Bucher, Sherri ; Neuman, Ida ; Chen, Minghua ; Tesfaye, Neghist ; Spector, Jonathan M. / "Helping babies breathe" training in Sub-Saharan Africa : Educational impact and learner impressions. In: Journal of Tropical Pediatrics. 2013 ; Vol. 59, No. 3. pp. 180-186.
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